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PÇestige mm^imm quick tips continued

Drilling holes for shelf-support pins

Most jigs for drilling holes for shelf pins are awkward to use and bulky to store. By contrast, this simple homemade jig is small, accurate, easy to use, and built to last.

To make this jig, start with a scrap block of 34-in.-thick medium-density fiberboard (MDF) and screw a hardwood fence to one edge. Measure in from the fence and install a registration dowel sized to fit your shelf-pin hole. Both the fence and the registration dowel should extend past the surface on both sides of the block: This allows the jig to be flipped over and used along both edges of the workpiece.

Now measure a distance down from the registration dowel and drill the guide hole. The distance from the registration dowel to the guide hole will set the spacing of the shelf-pin holes. I prefer a spacing of 2 in. If the jig is to be used just once, you can use the guide hole as is. However, if you want a jig you can use over and over, install a steel headless press-fit bushing, type P, (available from MSC Supply; www.mscdirect.com) for the guide hole.

To use the jig, install a depth stop on the drill bit. For this, use a M-in.-dia. dowel drilled along its axis and then cut to length so that only the correct amount of drill bit protrudes. Measure down from the top of the workpiece and drill two starting holes, one on each edge. Place the jig's registration dowel in the first hole and, while holding or clamping the fence against the edge of the workpiece, drill the second hole. Repeat this sequence while walking the jig down the workpiece until you have drilled all of the shelf-pin holes along one edge. Flip over the jig and repeat the process along the other edge.

-ANDREW FAIRBANK, Hammondville, NSW, Australia

Starting holes

Starting holes

Cabinet Drill Shelves Anatomy

MDF block

Workpiece

Registration dowel

Fence

MDF block

Workpiece

Registration dowel

Fence

Steel bushing

Steel bushing to guide drill bit

Dowel depth stop

Registration dowel

Workpiece

Steel bushing to guide drill bit

Dowel depth stop

Registration dowel

Workpiece

Diy Shelf Pin Jig
Shelf-support pin hole

Keyed miter joints

I like to reinforce the miter joints in door frames by adding a contrasting key after the glue in the joint has set. The usual method of cutting the key slot is with a tablesaw and a vertical 45° jig riding on the fence, but I find it easier and safer to make the cut on the router table with a three-wing slot-cutting bit (available from www.eagleamerica.com). The jig can be made in just minutes and has the advantage of enclosing the spinning bit throughout the operation. The resulting slot has a flat bottom and is uniform in width. Inexpensive bits are available to cut slots as narrow as V\6 in., which looks better on a small frame than the V&-in. slot produced by a tablesaw's blade. On larger frames, I cut two slots by setting the bit a little below the centerline, cutting the first slot, and then flipping the frame over for a second pass.

-PAUL DAVIS, Lake Stevens, Wash.

Jig slides past slot cutter in router.

Use a push stick to keep fingers away from exit point of bit.

Push Stick

Key slot

Door frame

Jig slides past slot cutter in router.

Use a push stick to keep fingers away from exit point of bit.

Key slot

Door frame

Irwin Quick Grip

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© 2006 IRWIN® Huntersville, NC 28078-1801 ♦versus other IRWIN one-handed bar clamps quick tips continued

Hook blocks for clamping miters

Wall-mounting cabinets

This simple method for hanging wall cabinets is fast, easy, and accurate. Rip a 5A-in.-thick board in two at a 45° angle. Screw one cleat to the wall to form a perch and the other cleat to the cabinet back, which should be recessed 34 in., as shown. Then just slip the cabinet over the wall cleat—a one-man operation. As a bonus, the cabinet can easily be removed whenever needed. To make the installation permanent, drive some screws through the back of the cabinet into the wall studs.

45° clamp block

Frame

45° hook block

45° clamp block

Frame

45° hook block

When gluing a miter joint, it's important to have strong clamping pressure across the joint line. To create clamping surfaces, I've used hot-melt glue to attach blocks to the frame parts. But these blocks aren't always easy to remove. And they sometimes pop loose, usually when you give the clamp handle a little extra twist.

I recently found a better way. Using 34-in.-sq. stock, I screw a 45° clamp block on one end and a 45° hook block on the other end. After slipping the hook block over the ends of the mitered workpiece, I apply pressure across the 45° clamping blocks. This process lets me build the two mitered halves of the frame. Then, to assemble the halves, I replace the 45° hook block with a 90° block and repeat the clamping process on the other two corners.

-DAN McARDLE, Clancy, Mont.

Sanding solid-wood edging on plywood

Sanding block

Pencil lines

Plywood

Plywood

; t

Edging

When applying solid-wood edging to plywood, I cut the edging a little wider than the thickness of the plywood. Once the edging has been applied, it sits slightly proud on both sides of the plywood. That allows me to sand the edging perfectly flush.

When sanding, however, it's easy to cut inadvertently through the thin plywood veneer. To avoid the problem, I scribble pencil lines across the edging and the veneer. Then, while sanding, I watch the pencil lines. When the lines on the veneer side begin to disappear, I know the edging is flush. Any sanding beyond that point is done veiy cautiously.

With a simple wall cleat and complementary cleat on the cabinet back, one person can hang a wall cabinet.

Interlocking cleats secure cabinet.

Fasten top cleat to cabinet.

Fasten bottom cleat to wall.

Interlocking cleats secure cabinet.

With a simple wall cleat and complementary cleat on the cabinet back, one person can hang a wall cabinet.

Fasten top cleat to cabinet.

Fasten bottom cleat to wall.

WESTERN

DOVETAIL

w HIGH QUALITY

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