Integrate Everything And Think Through The Details

For each of these projects, I started out from the big picture—for example, "we need a kitchen"—and followed the thought down to the tiniest details— "where can I hide the light switches?"—for these items are the dessert.

Wherever possible, I integrate all the requirements into one and create a hierarchy of planes to house all the elements, almost like strata in an archaeological dig or files on your computer's hard drive. I don't always get it right, but I almost always get to try it again. And the second time, I remember that the bullnose on the granite counter should stop short and revert to square just shy of the square-edge commercial range.

The pleasure all of this provides returns twice. The first is private, for me while I draw. The second is public after it is built, and with luck continues for the life of the house.

It's important to look at the big picture, but also to consider how to treat the smaller details. Do both early on, and your built-in project will reward you with form and function.

A wide hallway becomes a home office. This built-in desk incorporates several "rules." The upper cabinets get more attention than the base cabinets. Elegant curves grace the desk and the apron below the paper cubbies.

A wide hallway becomes a home office. This built-in desk incorporates several "rules." The upper cabinets get more attention than the base cabinets. Elegant curves grace the desk and the apron below the paper cubbies.

It's important to look at the big picture, but also to consider how to treat the smaller details. Do both early on, and your built-in project will reward you with form and function.

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Kitchens

That

Blend In

Let the house guide your design choices

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