Style In Furniture

works of Chippendale and Heppelwhite; when we come to see how the productions of the former stand in relation to those of Sheraton we shall find that the contrast between the two is exceptionally strong. While both based their styles, to a very large extent, on the French, the majority of the models to which Chippendale went for inspiration were produced at the most extravagant periods of the Rococo. Sheraton, with his greater refinement of taste, drew such of his ideas as were not purely original from the " Louis-Seize " —by far the most chaste and refined of all French styles— when occasion demanded that he should cater for those who demanded "something French/' and would be content with nothing else. So accurate and admirable, indeed, was his interpretation of that style that his version of it is commonly called in France " Louis-Seize-Anglaise," and, as we shall see, not without a certain amount of justification.

In 1791 appeared "The Cabinet Maker's and Upholsterer's Drawing-Book " (in four parts), by Thomas Sheraton. In this the author describes himself as "cabinet maker," and puts forward his book as being "recommended by many workmen of the first abilities in London, who have themselves inspected the work." It is in this volume that the best of this old master's designs are to be found.

That Sheraton's character had much in it that was idealistic is, in a certain measure, indicated by the frontispiece to "The Cabinetmaker's and Upholsterer's Drawing-Book," which is purely symbolical, though dignified in conception, and consists of a group of classically draped figures. The object of their introduction is explained by the author in a somewhat grandiloquent "apology," well worth quoting, even if only on account of its quaintness of diction. He says: " To show in as pleasing a way as I could the Stability of this Performance and the subject of the book in general, I have, by the figure on the right hand, represented Geometry standing on a rock, with a scroll

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