Style In Furniture

in Fig. 2 on the same plate; and of the third in Fig. 2, Plate

II., Figs. 2 and 5, Plate III., and in the historic table upon which Napoleon signed his abdication, shown on Plate V. With regard to these I may point out at the moment that, in Fig. 1, Plate I., in addition to the protective chimeree, the u Roman " shield and bay leaf are introduced in order to heighten the martial feeling of the whole; and that, in the chimerx of Fig. 6, we have the head and wings of the Imperial Eagle. The detail of the rest speaks for itself.

In studying the "Empire" with a view to tracing the influence which it exerted over early nineteenth-century English furnishings, special note should be made of the tables illustrated in Fig. 2, Plate II., Figs. 2 and 5, Plate

III., and the "Table de lAbdication" Plate V., for they are models that were seized upon, and " done to death/' by the early Victorian cabinet makers of this country. There can, surely, be but few of my readers who have not met, at one time or another, with many descendants of these. The turned pillar, and particularly the base, of the last are familiar friends which in our childhood's days suffered the impress of our boots. The top of the "Empire" pier-table was, more frequently than not, supported by slightly tapered, but by no means slender, legs, surmounted by a classically conceived female head and bust—as in Plate V.— or by the heads of animals or birds. In the tables illustrated it will be noticed that the imperial initial again plays an important part. The dainty little piece which appears in Fig. 5, Plate IV., seems almost to have crept in by mistake, as there is nothing of the stately spirit of the "Empire" about it. It is Napoleonic, however, as regards period; was included in the furnishing of one of the royal residences; and was probably designed and made to please the more delicate tastes of poor Josephine, or of her successor Maria Louisa, to both of whom their imperious master's persistent

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