Style In Furniture

I will now say a word or two about Sheraton's chairs in which upholstery plays the leading part, as in such examples as those in Figs, i, 3, and 5, Plate I. In instructions regarding their treatment it is specified that : " These chairs are finished in white-and-gold, or the ornaments may be japanned ; but the French finish them in mahogany with gilt mouldings. The figures in the tablets above the front rails are on French printed silk 01* satin sewed on to the stuffing with borders round them. The seat and back are of the same kind as in the ornamental tablet at the top. The top rail is panelled out, and a small gold bead mitred round, and silk pasted on."

So much for the a Sheraton99 chair and sofa. We may now turn our attention to the examination of some of that old master's cabinet work; and in so doing it will be convenient for us to commence with his designs for the furnishing of the dining-room, and see, in the first place, what hand he had in the development of the sideboard in the form in which it was then coming into vogue.

It has been explained, in the preceding chapter, that that article, as we know it to-day, found no place in the design books of the eighteenth-century cabinet maker, and I have ventured to express the opinion that the modern type is not such a very vast improvement when compared with the old, except perhaps in respect to increased accommodation for the accessories of the table. But the sideboard of Sheraton was more commodious than that of Heppelwhite, though very similar in form, as we have seen, and shall see further presently; and it is for us to discover now wherein the difference lay. The former has certain distinguishing features, which may be regarded almost in the light of " hall marks," so to speak.

In the first place, I will recapitulate the fact that Sheraton paid but little attention to the "side-table," which plays so important a part in Heppelwhite's book; and seldom intro-

Reference in Text. See pages 141, 171, 172, 173-261

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