Style In Furniture

The resemblance in other pieces is so apparent that I need not point it out in detail. True, some of these French ideas of the period only reached us by way of the Netherlands, but they came nevertheless from France in the first place. " But," some reader may urge, " one or two of the features mentioned appeared in England before the ' Louis-Quatorze' became a recognised style." True, but it must be remembered that the " Louis-Quatorze" was only a development of the " Louis-Treize " ; the "Louis-Treize" of the "Henri-Deux"; and the "Henri-Deux" of the "Francois-Premier." Each style retained some at least of the characteristics of those that preceded it. So that problem is easily solved.

The question of the relationship subsisting between the " Queen-Anne " and the style we are now briefly considering may safely be left for the student to " ferret out" for himself, and the task will call for no great keenness of scent. Let him compare most of the table-legs illustrated in the chapter on the former with those of the table shown in Fig. 2, Plate I., and he will be face to face with one feature which will demonstrate that point most effectually. Other resemblances, which cannot have been accidental, may easily be discovered by a comparative examination of the respective plates.

After studying the examples selected to illustrate this chapter, it will be apparent that, in its earlier stages, the " Louis-Quatorze" chair was somewhat stiff and severe in appearance—though most dignified. The straight line predominated in its general form, precisely as in our own " Elizabethan " and " Jacobean "; but later the curvilinear element commenced to make its appearance, and eventually succeeded in obtaining the upper hand, resulting in the creation of the distinct and individual style that followed.

Plate III. will convey some idea of a complete interior of the period in question. The panelling in this case is comparatively simple, though the emblematical sun, with its

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