Sheraton

name famous, and the chief characteristics of which we shall take into consideration later.

A glance at Fig. 1, Plate II., and a study of the whole of the decorative detail on Plate III., will aid in giving a still more complete conception of "Sheraton" chair making and upholstery generally. In the first we have a "conversation chair," and with reference to this class Sheraton writes : " These conversation chairs are used in library or drawing-rooms. The parties who converse with each other sit with their legs across the seat, and rest their arms on the top rail, which, for this purpose, is made about inches wide, stuffed, and covered.

" For the convenience of sitting in the manner just mentioned, the chair is made long between front and back, and very narrow in the back and front in proportion. The height of the chair to the stuffing is 3 feet; at the back 10 inches, spreading out in width to the top rail, which is 20 inches in length. The front is 16 inches, and the height of the seat as common." Here, of course, we have the "Louis-Seize" again ; as also in the " triple-back " settee, or u sofa," as it was styled, on Plate III. For the rest, the arms, balusters, and turning shown on the same plate will serve as a capital object lesson in the decorative detail of the style under notice.

Reverting for a moment to the " triple-back " settee, it was the designer's intention that the space between the three main divisions of the back should have "a ground-work covered with silk. . . . Against this ground the two columns and the ornament are supposed to rest."

It has been said, by a competent writer on the subject, that Sheraton " might generally be described as the English designer who adapted to our wants the fancies of the court of Marie Antoinette." A more apt summing-up of a certain, and perhaps the most important, section of his work could not be desired ; but taken literally, and by itself, it is calculated to convey but a limited idea of this designer's capabilities.

0 0

Post a comment