OStyle In Furniture

taken by a certain determined little Dutch Stadtholder, whose claims to the succession were that he was a grandson of Charles the First, a son-in-law of James the Second—and was a man who never knew when he was beaten ! Such was the type urgently wanted here at that time.

A brief reference to the bearing of this political change upon the style of our national furnishings will be useful. William, with his Dutch tastes and predilections, came with his consort and took possession; and he made it unmistakably clear at the outset that he intended to be absolute Dictator, notwithstanding the fact that his consort really had the stronger claim to the supreme control. That fact was presented to him, and he simply met it with the reply that he "was not going to be tied to the apron-strings of any woman " ; and he had his way. With him, of course, came many of his fellow-countrymen—not to mention fellow-countrywomen—as members of his court; and it was only natural that they should desire that their domestic environment here should remind them, as far as was practicable, of the homes they had temporarily left behind them in their own beloved Holland. On this account, unquestionably, Dutch furniture was imported to this country by the ship-load, and with it came into our midst the inspiration for that style which many people fondly regard as having been a national growth, and proudly describe as " Queen-Anne," in spite of the fact that the sovereign whose name they borrow had as much to do with its inception and subsequent development as the proverbial " man in the moon." The style was founded in the reign of William and Mary, and retained its popularity throughout those of Anne and George the First, and nearly the whole of that of George the Second; nevertheless "Queen-Anne" it was dubbed, and " Queen-Anne" it remains.

Before marking the characteristics of this new style, which was making its way so steadily and surely, we shall be fully

Reference in Text

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