Heppelwhite

drawers" as they were then termed—a class of article which, says Heppelwhite, " admits of but little variation " ; yet the "serpentine" front of the first, the graceful "sweep" of the second, and the shaping of the lower part of the cases of both, impart a distinct charm and individuality to them which at once raises them above the commonplace.

With Fig. 9 we return to work of a more ornate character. This "commode," as it is styled, is classed in Heppelwhite's book under the heading " Dressing Apparatus," but, in his description of it, the designer states that it is " adapted for the drawing-room," and explains further : " Within are shelves which answer the use of a closet or cupboard. It may have one principal door in front, or one at each end ; they are made of various shapes, and being used in the principal rooms require considerable elegance. The panels may be of satinwood, plain or inlaid ; the top, and also the border round the front, should be inlaid. The tops of these are frequently inlaid or painted work." It must be obvious, then, that this piece was never intended to play a part in the operations of the toilet, notwithstanding the place it occupies under "Dressing Apparatus."

One of the most sensible and serviceable articles of furniture originated by the cabinet makers of the eighteenth century was, without doubt, the double chest of drawers— the "High Boy," or "Tall Boy," as it was often called. These chests, with their wealth of accommodation for clothes, house linen, and soft goods of every description, always have brought, and always will bring, joy to the heart of the careful housewife; and it is astonishing that they have fallen into disrepute, for they are seldom to be met with nowadays, except in the form of treasured old examples. If any objection is to be urged against their use it is that the upper drawers, by reason of their height from the ground, are somewhat inaccessible; but they may be reserved for the storage of linen and other articles not often

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