Shaker Candle Table Dove Tail Legs

With help from a shop-built jig that rests on the bed of a lathe, a router fitted with a dovetail bit plows sockets in the column of a candle stand. The sockets will mate with sliding dovetails at the top ends of the legs. For instructions on making this jig, refer to page 81.

The early years of Shaker communities were far from bountiful. As one resident of the Hancock village said in 1791, "Our food was very scanty. But what we had, we ate with thankful hearts. For breakfast and supper, we lived mostly upon bean porridge and water porridge." By the second decade of the 19th Century, however, the Shakers' capacity for ceaseless hard work began to pay off in material prosperity.

Shaker dining tables are mute testament to the communities' success in fields, barns, and gardens. As increasing numbers of converts joined the movement, mealtimes saw the Shakers crowded elbow to elbow around the dinner table, eating in solemn silence and, as in most of their other activities, with the men and women separated.

Trestle tables (page 58) were common fixtures in most Shaker dining halls. With their narrow legs and unobstructed legroom allowing people to sit quite close together, the tables were well suited to the Shaker ethic. To facilitate the passing of food across the large tops, settings were divided into "squares" of four diners. Typically 10 feet long, Shaker trestle tables were built to seat

With help from a shop-built jig that rests on the bed of a lathe, a router fitted with a dovetail bit plows sockets in the column of a candle stand. The sockets will mate with sliding dovetails at the top ends of the legs. For instructions on making this jig, refer to page 81.

three squares of 12 people. The 6-foot-long table illustrated on page 58 seats eight comfortably.

Drop-leaf tables (page 68), with their expandable tops, were developed later than trestle types, becoming common by 1820. They were used in the dining hall as side tables or, occasionally, as dining tables. But the drop-leaf design is so practical that the Shakers found a multitude of applications for it everywhere from the dairy to the infirmary.

The pedestal table (page 78), or candle stand, was very popular with the Shakers. Strong and sturdy, it was light enough to move easily. Its tripod legs kept it from wobbling. The Shakers experimented endlessly with this basic form. The stand was built with convex, concave, or turned legs. Tops were made round, square or rectangular. Sometimes, the tops were simply rounded over or lipped, and some featured under-slung drawers to hold sewing supplies. Some tops had a groove in the lip to help in the packaging of seeds. (Oval or octagonal shapes were excluded, however, as being frivolous and too worldly.) The candle stand shown in this chapter is but one version of a popular and functional design.

A wooden support is pivoted under the leaf of the drop-leaf table shown at left. Over time, the support may tend to sag slightly, but the thin wedge glued to the underside of the leaf will compensate for the change, allowing the leaf to sit at the same level as the top.

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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