Shaker Classics

Made from quartersawn cherry veneer, the band for the box shown above is bent around a drying form after first being soaked in hot water and softened. The band is secured in its bent shape by copper tacks.

The same principles that guided the Shakers in their daily lives—purity, wholesomeness, and usefulness—are reflected in everything they built. Each of the small Shaker projects featured in this chapter—a wall clock, a step stool, an oval box, and a pegboard—is a classic example of this single-minded philosophy.

To the Shakers, no household item, no matter how small, could be considered frivolous or simple adornment. The term "knickknack" had no place in their lexicon. Whatever they made had to be strong, durable, and without fault. It also had to be perfectly suited to the purpose for which it was designed.

Wall clocks, like the one shown on page 118, and tall, freestanding grandfather clocks were essential to the Shakers' disciplined lives, but the Shakers designed other types for special needs. The homely "wag-on-the-wall" clock had no case, but only a small frame to protect the mechanism, and simply hung from a peg. They also made basic clocks for their barns that had only an hour hand. Even less ornate was the "tower clock" at Sabbathday Lake, Maine. This timepiece had no face or hands at all. Its main

Made from quartersawn cherry veneer, the band for the box shown above is bent around a drying form after first being soaked in hot water and softened. The band is secured in its bent shape by copper tacks.

feature was an 80-pound brass engine bell that sounded loudly on the hour.

Oval boxes, like those shown at left, were used to store a variety of dry goods. With their distinctive swallowtail fingers, straight sides, and smooth finish, the boxes were elevated by Shaker craftsmanship from mere vessels into things of beauty. That the Shakers made these boxes by the thousands while holding to a high standard of excellence is remarkable—and typical of their creed and craftsmanship.

The tall cabinets built by the Shakers created the need to access high shelves. The step stool shown on page 129 answered this requirement, becoming a mobile but sturdy staircase. Although its treads were often dovetailed into the sides, strength, rather than appearance, justified the attractive joinery.

The pegboard (page 138) is an example of how the Shakers stretched the usefulness of a humble item until it became an indispensable part of their lives. Pegs lined the walls of most Shaker homes, hanging everything from bookshelves and kitchen implements to clocks and chairs.

The rails, stiles, and divider of the frame for a Shaker wall clock are being glued up, secured by bar clamps. The rails and stiles shown at left are joined with rabbets, while the divider simply fits into dadoes cut across the stiles.

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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