Furniture Design For Schools And Shops

parts if equivalents will be regarded as one part only, or if they are not equivalents one at least must dominate either because of its —

size; tlie other two therefore will be nated to the dominant division or "r as the author has spoken of it in "Pre Wood-turning,11 See Plate 32. Here inet portion of sideboards "dominates* part design.

In ease the arrangement of a three-pa is sueh that two parts are equivalent

Fig. 8

phasized in excess of the remaining one, either because of their shape or size, then the order of subordination is reversed but unity still obtains. An example of the first order, in architecture, is given in a building which has a central main part with two smaller adjacent and extreme wings, Fig. 8. The second order is exemplified 1 uilding which has two large wings eon-wit h a smaller single part,, Fig, 9. pecial ease of a three-pari combination borders closely upon the sequence which < unity as distinguished from one which the one in which each succeeding part is nt in shape or size, or both. Here, how-he exception does not break the rule. In Igment of the best designers unity exist a

in such a combination. It is well that this is true, perhaps, for in furniture design this special case is the one into which most designs fall, as, for example, the average chair, the dresser, buffet, sideboard. chilToimier. and some tables. All of these may and often do have three distinct and

in such a combination. It is well that this is true, perhaps, for in furniture design this special case is the one into which most designs fall, as, for example, the average chair, the dresser, buffet, sideboard. chilToimier. and some tables. All of these may and often do have three distinct and

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