An Important Principle

Having considered the three first important expedients or rules, if they may be so called, pencil may be put to paper and the design developed line by line. First of all the "blocking-in" process takes place. By this is meant the determination of the general shape of the object by use of straight lines following the method of the architectural draftsman when he makes a "sketch", Fig. 7. In this step one essential consideration is made which the furniture designer borrows from the designer of buildings. It may be called the three-part principle in design which is so carefully developed in Robinson's "Architectural Composition."

In brief the principle is this: In every good design there is from one to three, and not more, emphasized divisions. See Plate 27 for example of one-part design. Plate 29 for example of two-part design. Plate 22 for example of three-part design. When more than three such divisions are made in a single whole, unity is lost because uniformity of shapes and sizes is present in the arrangement of the parts, or because there is no system used in such an arrangement. In an object of one part there is unquestionable unity. In a piece having two parts only, if one is sub-

ordinate to the other, as it must be unless it is the equivalent of the firet, (in which case the result is one part instead of two), there ïh also unity. See perspective, Phite Ml Likewise u* a three-part object unity exist* I ■ W - Up? tUr^

ordinate to the other, as it must be unless it is the equivalent of the firet, (in which case the result is one part instead of two), there ïh also unity. See perspective, Phite Ml Likewise u* a three-part object unity exist* I ■ W - Up? tUr^

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