Step The Second Phase

Move up to a finer grade of paper. If you plan to settle on two sandings, do this at about a grit 180 (5/0) paper, if you plan three steps, move first to a grit 150, then to a grit 180. Keep in mind these goals: elimination of any raised grain: elimination of scars made during repairs; achievement of a satin smooth surface.

Caution: Do Not Oversand It is possible to make the surface too smooth for the new finish. This is why we recommend abrasive paper only up to a fineness

Marble tops often are dull, stained and pitted. Relinish with wet-or-dry sandpaper in grits 120 to 600 and an orbital or oscillating sander First, sprinkle water on the surface

Start with the 120 grit paper in the sander and work it back and forth over the marble under fair pressure Keep spr:nkiing water every few minutes to keep the surface wet. A white paste will form as the marble dust mixes with the water. Keep an eye on the scratches and pits on the marble surface, and as they disappear, change to finer sandpaper grits The final polish should be done with a 400 grit or finer paper

Start with the 120 grit paper in the sander and work it back and forth over the marble under fair pressure Keep spr:nkiing water every few minutes to keep the surface wet. A white paste will form as the marble dust mixes with the water. Keep an eye on the scratches and pits on the marble surface, and as they disappear, change to finer sandpaper grits The final polish should be done with a 400 grit or finer paper

Wipe the marble clean occasionally to see how you are progressing The process may lake half an To raise the grain of an open-faced wood delib-hour or more, depending on the depths of the pits and scratches. When the marble is smooth and erately, first apply water, as shown here. The beauliful wash off all the white paste, allow the stone to dry. and apply a good marble polish ra'sed grain is then sanded smooth.

of grit 180. (f you sand with very fine papers or scrub with very fine steel wool, it is possible to go beyond sanding many hardwoods, and to actually polish them to an extremely smooth, tight finish. Such a tight finish will not accept stains and can cause problems from this point on, unless you intend the final finish to be natural wood finished only in lemon oil or wax.

We icarned this the hard way early in our refinishing career. We used very fine steel wool during the stripping operation on the legs of an upholstered chair. Later, when it came time to apply stain, we had a terrible time, and ended up by applying a colored varnish. The final result was not what we envisioned.

As a genera) rule, papers up to 180 or 200 {at the most) are for smoothing wood. Papers from 200 to 420 are for sanding between coats, where you want to eliminate dust and other specks, but not to remove much of the material. Papers of 360 to 400 are excellent for that final hand polishing of the finish. Papers above 400 can be used on the finai finish, too. They also are recommended for polishing of bare woods.

The softer the wood, the less likely you are to polish it to a hard finish through heavy sanding with fine abrasives. Just remember that when you have finished sanding, the surface must be open and receptive to the stain you apply, not scaled against it.

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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