Step Finishing the Veneer

Veneer should be finished like any other furniture wood. Sanding is vital. You may not always be able to see them, but there are saw marks in the surfaces of most veneers. When you gel them, veneers have not been sanded at all and these saw marks

Use contact cement solvent to clean all contact cement and any gum from the masking tape off of the veneer Caution: Test the solvent on a sample of the veneer before doing this; especially when veneering exotic woods in rare cases, the solvent may cause the coloring in the wood to run.

Before finishing, sand the veneer face thoroughly to eliminate saw marks in its surface Use coarse, then medium, then fine and very fine paper to get the veneer ready for a stain and the finishing coats of varnish.

We deliberately cut these veneer panels slightly oversize so they could be trimmed in place. Use the veneer saw and a straightedge.

Now pull off the masking tape. The butted pieces should fit (ightty together. You can see the joint — but |ust barely The finishing process will hide it completely.

After giving the contact cement a couple of hours to set, sand the edges The edge of our hand sander was a perfect fit for this job. If it hadn't been, we would have made a small hand sander of the right size and shape from a block of wood.

will show up all too plainly once the final finish is applied unless you sand thoroughly during finishing. Don't use a coarse paper, but start with a medium grade and graduate through several finer grades until the surface is smooth.

You probably will want to stain your veneer, but keep in mind that the stain should enhance, not hide, the beautiful grain. We feel that the purpose of a stain in this case is to bring out the color and the pattern of the wood. We lightly used a brown-red gelled stain on the rosewood of the 1852 dresser. We applied just a little and rubbed it thoroughly. This deepened the blacks and enhanced the reds of the veneer, but covcrcd none of the pattern.

We used a clear polyurethane plastic finish on the 1852 dresser, and selcctcd

Now pull off the masking tape. The butted pieces should fit (ightty together. You can see the joint — but |ust barely The finishing process will hide it completely.

Use contact cement solvent to clean all contact cement and any gum from the masking tape off of the veneer Caution: Test the solvent on a sample of the veneer before doing this; especially when veneering exotic woods in rare cases, the solvent may cause the coloring in the wood to run.

Before finishing, sand the veneer face thoroughly to eliminate saw marks in its surface Use coarse, then medium, then fine and very fine paper to get the veneer ready for a stain and the finishing coats of varnish.

the satin finish. You might want a glossy finish on some veneers. Apply the finish just the same as on any solid wood.

We deliberately cut these veneer panels slightly oversize so they could be trimmed in place. Use the veneer saw and a straightedge.

After giving the contact cement a couple of hours to set, sand the edges The edge of our hand sander was a perfect fit for this job. If it hadn't been, we would have made a small hand sander of the right size and shape from a block of wood.

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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