Step Aligning the Pieces

first step is to clamp the two pieces together, as shown in the accompanying photographs. Use a pencil and a rule to draw a straight line across both pieces, at the point where they are to be doweled. Now take the clamp off.

Step 2: Aligning the Jig Pui the doweling jig on the first piece, clamping the jig in place after sighting the penciled line through it. There is a graduated marking on the jig to help you with ihis positioning.

Step 3: Drilling the Hole Insert your drill bit into the drill guide on the jig and drill a hole that is slightly deeper than hall ihe length of the dowel. Repeat the process on the other piece of wood. Most dowel joints have two or three dowels, not just one, so do the same task as many times as necessary.

Step 4: Inserting the Dowels Coat each dowel with glue and insert the dowels into the holes in one of the pieces. If your

The jig comes with a set of metal lubes that serve as drill guides Place the correct size In Ihe jig Sight through it lo see the gu<de line and adjust the knobs until Ihe jig is positioned Then tighten Ihe adjustment knobs.
Using a drill bii ol the right size, make Ihe dowel hole by drilling down ihrough ihe drill guide If necessary, use a depth guide to control the depth of the hole

After coating the dowels with glue, insert Ihem then lap the two workpieces with a rubber mallet to drive them together. Here rounded edges emphasize the joint Otherwise it would be nearly invisible

The holes have been drilled in both work pieces Because !he jig was set over the guidelines, each hole Is exactly opposite its mate. Try Ihe dowels, to make sure they fit properly.

joint has three dowels, insert all three into the same side, Step 5: Finishing the Joint Kit the other piece over the protruding glue-coated dowels, and use your rubber mallet to lap the piece until ihe joint is tight. Wipe off any excess glue around the joint. Then apply a clamp to hold the joint tight until the glue dries.

After coating the dowels with glue, insert Ihem then lap the two workpieces with a rubber mallet to drive them together. Here rounded edges emphasize the joint Otherwise it would be nearly invisible

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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