Replacement Rungs

Rungs and stringers can be so badly shattered that no surgery of any kind can mend them. Then ihe only thing to do is replace them. If the pieces to be replaced are square or rectangular or round and un-shaped in any way, you should be able to buy hardwood of the approximate size and make new ones without trouble. More often than not, however, these pieces have been turned on a lathe and given some kind of shape. Then the only way to replace them is either to shape a duplicate piece on a lathe yourself or have it done by someone else.

There is nothing technically difficult about shaping a piece such as this on a lathe. It is a simple, straightforward task, a snap for someone who owns and knows how to use a wood lathe. It is probable that the rung or other piece may have to be made to match another part in shape. This, too, isn't a problem for an experienced lathe operator, using the picce to be matched as a guide. The only additional advice we can add is that the new piece should be made of the same species of wood as the one it replaces, so that you can finish it to match.

With the break sti held open, paint white glue down into the crack, until ah Ihe surlaces are well covered.

This chair needs regluing The glue is too good for the joints to be taken apari. regluing must be done with the chair assembled.
W^h the rungs all in position, firmly drive each rung deep :nto its hole, using the rubber mallet to join the two pieces.

Two C-clamps. with small wood pads lo protect the furniture surface, are now used to tightly clamp the pieces together.

Paint glue Into each of the rung holes. Use a little muscle power to get the rungs into Ihe holes in which they belong.
Strap clamp for pressure on reglued joints; no other clamps are needed To tighten strap {"web") clamp, turn large adjustment screw

HOW TO REPAIR The easiest and CRACKED OR strongest repair is BROKEN TENONS to use your back-saw to cut off the oJd tenon stump Hush

To soften joints for disassembly, paint with a vinegar-and-warm-water mixture. If still firm, the joint doesn't need regiuing

with the wood surface. Then chisel out the old tenon if necessary and make a hardwood plug to fill the mortise. Glue it into the hole. Be sure the plug is flush with the surface and not above it. Now join the parts with two or three dowels.

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When you find it difficult to take apart a chair you might suspect that the dowel or tenon has been locked in place with a small pin, headless nail, or a dowel. Look for a small hole, usually filled with wood filler, in the leg Use a nailset to drive the pin out

When you find it difficult to take apart a chair you might suspect that the dowel or tenon has been locked in place with a small pin, headless nail, or a dowel. Look for a small hole, usually filled with wood filler, in the leg Use a nailset to drive the pin out

When only one joint is loose, repair the tenon without disassembling the chair. A piece of wood serves as a wedge to hold joint open

This tenon has worn too smafrto fit into the mortise. Cement a thin veneer shim to the side of the tenon with contact cement

Sand the shim down until the tenon is the right size to fit snugly into the mortise We made a small sanding block for the |Ob.

HOW TO REPAIR In a case like this, A LOOSE the tenon has

TENON JOINT shrunk and no longer fits snugly into the mortise. One solution is to rebuild the sides of the tenon by gluing thin shims of hardwood to it. You need very thin wood for this work; we have found small pieces of veneer to be excellent. You can buy veneers from specialty houses by mail and from some local furniture and craft shops. You also can buy thin sheets of birch at any shop dealing in model airplane supplies.

A Disassembled Piece Cut a small rectangle of veneer to the exact size of the tenon. Glue this to one side of the tenon and allow the glue to dry. Sand the joined edges to make a smooth fit. Then try the new tenon in its mortise. It should fit snugly. If the new tenon is a little too large, use coarse sandpaper to sand the tenon down. If the new tenon is a little too small, apply another shim to the other side. If you detect an up-and-down movement after inserting the tenon, you can put a tiny shim on the bottom.

An Assembled Piece In those cases where you haven't disassembled the piece, you can make a similar repair by pulling the tenon out of the mortise as far as you can, applying glue to the veneer piece and the tenon. Place the shim in the mortise next to the tenon. Tap the joint back together and clamp until the glue dries, if you think one shim may not be enough, fit the shims around the tenon and tap the joint together without glue first. If the joint seems solid, tap it apart, apply the glue, and retap it together.

When only one joint is loose, repair the tenon without disassembling the chair. A piece of wood serves as a wedge to hold joint open

The shim, cut from a sheet of veneer, is also coated with contact cement Let both dry for an hour Apply the shim to the tenon

This tenon has worn too smafrto fit into the mortise. Cement a thin veneer shim to the side of the tenon with contact cement

Sand the shim down until the tenon is the right size to fit snugly into the mortise We made a small sanding block for the |Ob.

Look for screws in corner blocks, and also at the back, holding the seat to the back. Screws sometimes are hidden under wood plugs. Pry up the plug, remove the screw beneath it
If you damage or break the plug in getting it out, you can buy a new plug to replace it Be careful not to damage the wood frame

After the glue has begun to soften, use a penknife to dig clots of glue out of crevices and to scrape the surfaces clean

If all the glue is not removed, the two pieces will not fit together properly when they are reglued. Scrape away all excess glue.

HOW TO REPAIR Solid wood chair CRACKED CHAIR seats, cabinet SEATS sides, and table-

tops sometimes end up cracked or even broken into two pieces. The best method for repairing them is to glue the separated parts back together, using a series of three or four dowels as reinforcement. In other words, create a dowel joint between the two broken parts. Apply glue along the whole length of the break. Then clamp the pieces firmly as the repair dries. This will join the two parts and make them stronger than they were before the break.

Once the screws are out. tap with your rubber mallet to knock the chair apart

The oak chair was reglued after the seat broke, and the repair didn't hold Apply warm vinegar and water to soften the old glue.

The first step in repairing this cracked oak seal is to clamp the broken pieces together exactly as they will be when doweled

We plan to use four dowels in the repair, so we Draw lines across the cracked edge at each To guarantee correct depth of dowel holes, now draw marks across the crack at each point mark on the unclamped seal Hold one piece in wrap a piece of tape around the upper part of the vise place doweling jig over lines. the drill bit as a depth marker where a dowel will be used where a dowel will be used

Add the depth of the hole (1 inch) to the length of Now each dowel is painted with carpenter's Gently tap each dowel all the-way into the holes the jig guide tube Place the tape's edge this white glue, and is then inserted in its hole in one with a hammer Half of each dowel will project distance from the bit bottom of the seat pieces from the surface

After all dowels are in place in one side, paint a Position the other piece of the seat on the dowels. Drive it down onto the dowels. Use bar or pipe generous amount of white glue on the protrud- clamps to hold the two pieces firmly together Turn the ad|usting screws tight, to force the glued ing dowels and along the seat edge. edges into snug continuous contact When dry, sand for a smooth seam

Veneer sorneiimes acquires a bubble in the sur-lace. One way to repair it is to first cut an "x" in the surface with a craft knife

Carefully lilt the edges of the bubble (II it seems hard to lilt, moisten It slightly.) Scrape away oid glue, apply new adhesive.

Veneer sorneiimes acquires a bubble in the sur-lace. One way to repair it is to first cut an "x" in the surface with a craft knife

HOW TO REPAIR The best glue to DAMAGED use when mend-

VENEER ing veneered pieces is the type of contact cemenl made for veneering. It is available wherever veneers are sold. If you can't find it, then use the contact cement you can buy at your home center. You use it by coating the two surfaces to be mated, allowing them to dry, and then fitting them together. Keep in mind that the lit must be perfect because once the pieces come together, they can't be separated.

Veneer Edge Repairs One common veneer problem is veneer on a tabletopthat has lifted off of the sub wood. If the veneer has lifted at the edge of the tahletop and is undamaged, the repair consists simply of regluing it to the subwood.

Veneer Surface Repairs If the repair must be made in the middle of the top, away from the edges, the problem is a litlle different. Veneers that have lifted off the subwood in the middle of stable top (or other field) seldom can be fitted down into the same place again. The veneer seems to be larger than the place from which it lifted, as if it had stretched. Such lifts-tiffs begin as bubbles in the veneer. Then the bubble breaks, leaving broken and lifted veneer. In your examination, you may find some veneer bubbles which haven't broken yet. These should be fixed before they can break.

Veneer bubbles To fix a bubble of veneer, use a razor-sharp craft knife guided by the steel rule, and make an X cut across the bubble. Avoid making cither cut of the X directly with the grain of the wood. Use the blade of the knife to scrape away any old glue in the repair area; then

Carefully lilt the edges of the bubble (II it seems hard to lilt, moisten It slightly.) Scrape away oid glue, apply new adhesive.

carefully fit the flaps down in place. If they make a smooth fit, you can go ahead and glue them down. Use an artist's brush to apply contact cement to (he underside of each flap of veneer and to the subwood. Hold the flaps up long enough for the cement to dry; press them down into place. Use a veneer or wallpaper seam roller to securc the repair.

Veneer patch If the bubble has broken before you begin the repair, the veneer flaps may be damaged and won't fit down into place properly. If that happens, use the technique described in the next paragraph for replacing missing pieces of veneer. This entails using a razor knife to cut out the damaged area, then filling the area with a patch of veneer cut to the corrcct shape.

Veneer that has lifted and broken, whether in the center of the table or at ihe end, has to be replaced by a patch of new veneer. In most eases, the veneer will have broken oft after lifting from the substrate but no one will have the broken piece. If this is your situation, check the veneer still on the table to see that it adheres firmly in place. Look especially right around the edges of the break, where the patch must be made. Determine how much of it can be reglued and how much of it must be cut away.

Now buy a piece of veneer of the same wood species. Remember thai the color of the veneer on the table is the result of staining, so the veneer you buy won't be the color of the tablet op. S f the patch is of the same species, you will be able to stain it to the same color after the repair is finished,

Use the metal straightedge rule as a

To set the patch, firmly roll Ihe area ol the blister with a veneer roller. Cover the area completely and wipe away any excess.
Cover she patch with kraft paper and a block slightly larger than the buttle Weight the block with books lor 24 hours.

guide and cul the edges of the veneer around the damaged area so they arc straight. Make the damaged area into a simple shape — square, diamond or rectangle. Remove only as much of the oid veneer as necessary.

Now cut a patch of the exact size and shape as the cut-out area. Cut and trim ihis piece until the fit is perfect. Coat one side of the patch and also the damaged area wiih contact cement, allow it to dry, and then placc the patch in the damaged area.

Use a veneer roller or wallpaper seam roller to apply heavy pressure to the patch, to be sure that it is well seated and that the two glued surfaces are in good contact. Finally, stack a pile of books or other heavy items on top of the repair overnight, to hold it in place while the glue sets completely.

An alternative method of repair involves removing the broken veneer. Cut through to create a rectangular hoie; chisel out

From matching veneer, cut a patch that is identical to the hole in Ihe veneered surface. A straightedge helps make straight cuts.

An alternative method of repair involves removing the broken veneer. Cut through to create a rectangular hoie; chisel out

From matching veneer, cut a patch that is identical to the hole in Ihe veneered surface. A straightedge helps make straight cuts.

Patch

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Give the patch a slightly beveled edge so that the bottom is narrower than the top

Give the patch a slightly beveled edge so that the bottom is narrower than the top

Try to fit the patch Then use a file to produce the exact fit that you need

HOW TO REPAIR The edges and cor-BROKEN EDGES ners of furniture, AND CORNERS and especially tab-ietops, often take a beating. It isn't uncommon to find whole corners broken off of solid w ood tabletops, or to find a layer or two of wood missing from a tablctop made of plywood or laminated wood layers. A heavy item may fall against an edge and dent it severely. Damage of this type is most commonly found on tables, but can happen to chairs and cabinets, especially lowboys, as well.

The problem is how to fill the broken or dented area in order to restore its original shape and appearance. If the dent is relatively small, you can fill it w ith stick shellac. We cover that technique in a later chapter on repairing finishes. If the dent is large — '/: inch or more — it is best to make a permanent wood repair. You will have to use your own judgment on which type of repair to use.

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Responses

  • Miranda Diggle
    Where to buy chair rungs?
    1 year ago
  • VIHTORI
    How to fix chair rung that is broken on both sides?
    1 year ago
  • amethyst
    How to replace a chair rung?
    6 months ago
  • doreen
    How do i keep chair rungs from coming out?
    3 months ago
  • alice
    How to make new chair wrungs?
    9 days ago

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