Collar Caster Construction

The casters, which drop out of sockets in the bottoms of legs, are of simple construction. Understanding their construction will help you to fix them. Looking at the bottom of the leg, you see a collar around the hole. This collar has teeth that have been tapped into the wood to hold the collar in place. Up inside the leg, attached to this collar, is a tubular socket. The sides of this socket have been split into three or four wings. The stem of the caster has a slighlly bulbous end, and when it is pushed all the way into this tube, it forces the wings apart. Then they close just under the bulbous end and prevent the caster from falling out.

Repairing the Caster When a caster does drop out, it usually means that these wings have become bent outward, so they no longer grip the bulbous end of the caster stem. The repair consists entirely of bending those wings back together again. To remove the socket from the leg so this can be done, pry up the collar on the bottom of the leg to loosen it. Then grip it with a pliers and pull. Use the pliers to bend the wings on the socket. Put the socket back in the hole and tap the collar into the wood. The caster now will stay in the leg.

Replacing a Caster Replacing the old casters with new ones, if that should be necessary, is equally as simple. Just pull out the old sockets and insert the new ones. Only one caution: Be sure the new sockets are the same diameter as the old ones.

To fix casters that drop out of their sockets, lift out the socket with an awl and a hammer. The collar of the socket has teeth embedded in the leg. Drive the awl between the teeth.

A plate caster is one that screws to Ihe botlomof the furhlture instead of being inserted into a socket A small shaft fits up into a hole in the leg to hold the caster steady

Reinsert [he easier socket. Drive it ail the way in, the teeth on the socket collar will dig 'nto the wood of the leg.

Here, the caster is in place on the bottom of our 1852 dresser Three screws will be driven up through the plate into Ihe leg to keep the caster in a firm steady position

Lift the socket slightly with the awl. thei\use a pliers to turn and lift it.

The end ol the socket is filitted to form several "wings." Bent inward, these wings hold the caster up in I he leg. Those shown have bent outward and no longer grip the caster. Use a pliers to bend them inward again

Lift the socket slightly with the awl. thei\use a pliers to turn and lift it.

The end ol the socket is filitted to form several "wings." Bent inward, these wings hold the caster up in I he leg. Those shown have bent outward and no longer grip the caster. Use a pliers to bend them inward again

Reinsert [he easier socket. Drive it ail the way in, the teeth on the socket collar will dig 'nto the wood of the leg.

Put the caster back in its socket.

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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