Caster Wheels

If the casters appear to be in good shape-but won't roll properly, examine the wheel shaft. Rug fibers and threads often wrap around these and act as little brakes. Clean out the debris and the caster will work.

Look also for a bent shaft or bent metal sides. If you find either problem, buy new casters. Try to lubricate casters on a regular basis. We suggest silicone lubricant, or any type that doesn't contain an oil that might stain carpeting.

Here, the caster is in place on the bottom of our 1852 dresser Three screws will be driven up through the plate into Ihe leg to keep the caster in a firm steady position

A plate caster is one that screws to Ihe botlomof the furhlture instead of being inserted into a socket A small shaft fits up into a hole in the leg to hold the caster steady

The dramatic difference between before restoration (above) and after (right) shows the results of careful work

RECONSTRUCT- This is the golden ING AN oak chest pictured

OAK CHEST on the cover be fore we went to work on it. The history of this piecc is described in detail on page 4. This series of photographs presents the restoration work carried out on the finish, ball legs and hardware.

Our first |0b was to make a list of repairs, which included restoring this split ball leg. The original wood was long gone.

The dramatic difference between before restoration (above) and after (right) shows the results of careful work

We began the repair by gluing new wood, cut to the size needed, to the leg "collar

The new wood then was carvea to the shape of the ball, using a sanding disc that was mounted on a portable efeclric drill

This is the restored leg. stained lor photographic purposes. It will get a final sanding and staining later, when we finish the chest.

Second on the list ol repairron the oak chest Is the edge of the door. wh>ch had been splintered when pried open during the burglary.

Next, using a Dremel Flex-Tool with a highspeed carving hit. we carved the new wood to match the original shape.

The new wood then was carvea to the shape of the ball, using a sanding disc that was mounted on a portable efeclric drill

The firs! step n the edge repair is to cut away the splintered edge with the rouler. using a '/s-inch rabbetting bit.

This is the new collar, carved and ready for sandmg and staining in order to produce a smooth surface to match the existing wood

This is the restored leg. stained lor photographic purposes. It will get a final sanding and staining later, when we finish the chest.

Here you can see how the edge ol the door was rabetted The splintered wood is gone, and is ready to receive a new piece of wood

New wood was glued lo the ball ol the leg. roughly culling it to size before applying it. A pipe clamp was used as the glue dries.

Second on the list ol repairron the oak chest Is the edge of the door. wh>ch had been splintered when pried open during the burglary.

This piece of new oak, cut to fit. is fitted into the rabbeted edge. We took pains to make sure measurements and fit were exact.

Refmishing the hardware came next, it was solid brass, but in bad condition Each piece was first polished on the wire brush wheel.

A test patch of the finish indicated that the original stain was in fair condition, so we removed only the old finish, using Formby's Refinisher and steel wool pads.

This drawer has been stripped of the old finish The old stain is sound but it had laded, so we applied a new coal of stain to bring up the golden oak color

Refmishing the hardware came next, it was solid brass, but in bad condition Each piece was first polished on the wire brush wheel.

These little pieces were too small to hold in our hands for spraying, so we set them up on nails that served as steady supports

If the hardware had been only dirty, we might have skipped the wire brush ng and simpiy cleaned it with a good metal polish.

Most ol the drawer stops had disappeared, so we added new ones You can see the refinished wood s pleasing appearance.

Alter bringing the brass to a lovely glow, we sprayed each piece with clear lacquer to protect it from dirt and hard use

This is the array of clamps used to hold the new edge as ¡he glue dried. Spring clamps hold the piece down, while pipe and bar clamps apply pressure across the door

It bothered us that the drawers did not have drawer guides, so we installed some by gluing on thin strips of wood

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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