Method Of Joining The Legs And Rails Of A Stool

1 Cut the four legs and the rails to size. Because they are sloped by 5° from the vertical, the two front legs are slightly longer than the back ones. There are two rails for each side and three long cross rails that join the two sides together.

2 The method of construction is to make and glue the two sides before joining them together with the longer cross rails. All the joints are mortise and tenons, with those at the tops of the legs having a haunch (see Fig 6.6; see also page 23). Because the two front legs slope by 5°, the tenons on the ends of the side rails which butt up to them have haunches that also slope by 5°.

To make the sloping tenons, set an angle of 5° on a sliding bevel and use to mark the haunches (see Fig 6.7), prior to cutting in the same way as for normal tenons. The tenons at the other end of the side rails and the ones on the longer cross rails are all made following the procedure on page 22.

3 Using the tenons as a guide for size, mark and cut the mortises in the legs. To make the job easier, drill some of the waste wood out first, and then use a bevel-edged chisel to chop out

FIG 6.5

Stool construction.

the rest. When drilling out the mortises for the side rails on the sloping front legs, the drill is held not at 90° to the leg, but at 5° off the vertical. In order to do this, make a jig with a 5° slope from scrap wood, to fit on to the base of your drill. With the legs held on this, it is much easier to drill the holes for the mortise at the required angle (see Fig 6.8).

Bracket

FIG 6.7

Using a sliding bevel to mark the slope of the haunch for a mortise and tenon joint.

FIG 6.8

Drilling a sloping hole with a jig.

FIG 6.8

Drilling a sloping hole with a jig.

FIG 6.9

Ensuring that the stool sides are square when clamped.

FIG 6.9

Ensuring that the stool sides are square when clamped.

4 Test each individual joint for accuracy, and then glue and clamp the two sides. Before the adhesive is dry, check that the structure is square (see Fig 6.9). When the adhesive is dry, lay one side over the other to check that they are exactly the same size, and make any necessary adjustments. Mark the ends of the sloping front legs at the correct angle using the sliding bevel and saw them off.

5 On the inside of the lower rails, where the holes for the pivots are to be drilled, glue on two hardwood blocks to strengthen them and help support the pivot. Now drill the pivot holes right through the rails and hardwood blocks. This will enable the step to be assembled into the stool once everything has been painted. When eventually the stool and step are assembled and the pivot is pushed into place, plugs of wood will be made to fit into the open ends of these holes to hold the pivot in place.

6 Assemble the two sides and the long cross rails and glue everything into place. To strengthen the assembly, cut out and fix the four corner braces to the inside of the top rails with glue and screws.

7 Cut the stool top to size and apply several coats of clear matt polyurethane varnish. Screw the top to the stool assembly. Paint the stool in the same way as the step.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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