Fronts

There are several designs for drawer fronts that are widely used.

An inserted front slides into the carcass so that the front of it is approximately flush with the front of the carcass. To look good, this requires the drawer front to be an accurate fit in the drawer housing. A beading strip around the drawer front can be used to disguise any ugly gaps. An overhanging front stands proud of the carcass and is usually larger than the drawer, so that it completely covers the drawer housing. This has the advantage of concealing any misfit between the drawer and the carcass.

A third method of attaching the front is to make the drawer as a complete open-topped box and then fit a false front to the existing front. This can be positioned very accurately, so that it fits perfectly into the carcass, before it is screwed into place. An easy method of accomplishing this is to put the drawer into the carcass and stick the false front in the required position with double-sided sticky tape, withdraw it from the cabinet and then screw the false front into place.

FIG 3.5

Drawer construction.

Cutaway view of the top of a drawer ^ with an inserted / front.

Cutaway view of the top of a drawer ^ with an inserted / front.

Cutaway view of the top of a drawer with an overhanging false" front.
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