Barefaced Housing Joint

Used for joining the corners of any box structure and occasionally for fitting shelves, this joint is simple to make using

FIG 4.1

Making a bare-faced housing joint.

hand or power tools. When a carcass has to be made simply and quickly, and strength or decoration are not the overriding considerations, this is an acceptable method to use.

A rebating plane will cut the shoulders accurately, while the rebate housing can be cut with a tenon saw and chisel after first scoring it across the grain with a knife. A router with a straight bit will cut both parts of the joint with equal ease, although it might take several passes for large joints in thick-section stock.

A bare-faced housing joint is slightly more complicated to make than a simple through housing joint and does not have any noticeable advantages for applications such as fixing shelves into a cabinet.

Barefaced Housing Joint

1 Mark the rebate on the first piece corresponding to half the thickness of the plank, and cut across the grain with a marking knife. On the adjacent corner, mark the housing for the rebate in the same way.

2 Use a plane to cut the rebates on the ends of the sides. It is easier to do this across the grain of the plank rather than on the end grain.

Joint Use Furniture Making

3 On the adjacent corner, cut the sides of the rebate housing with a tenon saw.

Cutting Corner Rebate

2 Decide how many pins are required and use a pair of dividers to mark the pin widths and the distances between them. Draw the lines that mark the sides of the pins parallel to the sides of the plank. Indicate the areas of waste wood.

Coping Saw Cutting Joints

4 Remove the waste between the pins with a coping saw. Do not cut right up to the line: stop just short and remove the last small pieces by chopping with a bevel-edged chisel, held on the line and perpendicular to the surface.

Barefaced Housing Joint

1 On the end of the plank where the joint is to be formed, use a marking gauge to scribe a line corresponding to the thickness of the plank.

4 Remove the waste between the pins with a coping saw. Do not cut right up to the line: stop just short and remove the last small pieces by chopping with a bevel-edged chisel, held on the line and perpendicular to the surface.

1 On the end of the plank where the joint is to be formed, use a marking gauge to scribe a line corresponding to the thickness of the plank.

2 Decide how many pins are required and use a pair of dividers to mark the pin widths and the distances between them. Draw the lines that mark the sides of the pins parallel to the sides of the plank. Indicate the areas of waste wood.

3 Cut the vertical sides of the pins with a tenon saw, ensuring that the saw kerf is on the waste wood side of the marked line.

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Responses

  • Saradoc
    What is barefaced used for in furniture?
    7 years ago
  • swen
    Where would a barefaced housing joint be used?
    7 years ago
  • MICHELINO
    What is a bare faced housing joint?
    3 years ago

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