Assembling Legs And Gates

Before assembling, clean off all pencil marks with glasspaper and bring all parts to a smooth finish. The leg assembly is put together dry so that the correct length can be found for the pins and the swinging legs, which were initially made oversize at both ends.

1 Using a flat, level area, put the structure together and then mark the length to which the pins must be cut. Take care to cut the length of the lower pin accurately: when assembled, the weight of the gate is taken on the end of the pin where it rests on the supporting bracket, and if the pin is not long enough its shoulder will rest on the lower rail that connects the two main supports, eventually wearing the rail and leaving it looking ugly. The pin should therefore be long enough to hold the shoulder hem (2mm) above the rail. Disassemble the structure, and cut the pins and gate legs to the correct length.

2 Before the assembly is glued together, varnish it with three coats of clear matt polyurethane varnish. Then glue and clamp the assembly together (see Fig 7.13).

FIG 7.13

The main support assembled with the gates.

FIG 7.13

The main support assembled with the gates.

FIG 7.14

Table top showing position and ditnension for battens.

Part view of table top with dimensions.

TABLE TOP

The planks for the top are not a standard nominal size, so wood with a thicker section was chosen and planed down to size.

FIG 7.16

Drilling the dowel holes for the table top.

TABLE TOP

The planks for the top are not a standard nominal size, so wood with a thicker section was chosen and planed down to size.

1 Cut the planks for the top to length and lay them down in position, with the growth rings on the end grain alternately up and down (see page 21). Cut the lengths slightly longer than required to leave enough room to form the rounded shape. Try to ensure that any faults or cracks are on the underside of the table top. Mark each plank to indicate its position in relation to the one next to it and which is the top side.

FIG 7.16

Drilling the dowel holes for the table top.

FIG 7.17

The centre section of the top, clamped together.

2 Start with the two planks that make up the centre section and, using a try square and plane, ensure that the edges are square to the face and that the planks butt together without showing a gap. Using a jig, make a series of holes for a dowelled edge-to-edge joint (see Fig 7.16; see also page 21). Fit the dowels into the holes but do not glue them, and test the joint for fit. Glue and clamp the joint (see Fig 7.17) and, when dry, plane the top and bottom surfaces.

3 To make the semicircular flaps you will need to make up a trammel bar from a scrap of wood to draw out the edge. This consists simply of a length of wood with a pin through one end and a pencil pushed through a hole in the other. The piece of wood should measure approximately 19 x 3/8 x lin (483 x 9 x 25mm) and the distance between the pin point and the pencil point should be 17in (432mm).

4 Arrange the planks in the correct position to make one of the drop flaps and draw the semicircle for the edge of the table. This enables the dowels to be positioned accurately and not too near the edge. Do not cut around the edge yet (the straight edges make clamping easier). Drill the dowel holes and then glue and clamp the planks together.

5 When the glue is dry, plane the top and bottom faces flat, using the plane diagonally across the boards as well as in the grain direction. If there is any tear out due to difficult grain, it may help to put the curling iron closer to the tip of the cutting iron and close the mouth of the plane by moving the frog forward a little (a large mouth opening is for removing a lot of wood fast, while a smaller gap is required for difficult grain). Redraw the table edge using the trammel and then cut out on a band saw. Make up the other flap in the same way.

6 Smooth the edges of all three sections of the top to take out any small humps and hollows left by the band saw. Use a plane on the flat edges of the centre section and a large file or rasp on the curved section, holding the rasp diagonally across the edge and as flat as possible. Stop frequently to assess progress visually and ensure that you are not putting in extra hollows.

7 Round off the edges, using a smoothing plane on the straight edges and a spokeshave on the curved edges. The method with both tools (see Fig 7.18) is to flatten off the corners in two stages to form half an octagonal cross section and then make a few cuts to eliminate the remaining corners. Remove any remaining flat spots with a couple of different grades of glasspaper held on a block.

First cuts .1

Edge of table

Second cuts 1

Finish with glasspaper

FIG 7.18

Rounding off the edge of the table.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment