Scissors Chair and Table

m t's hard to imagine why this particular style of outdoor furniture has come to be known as "scissors" furniture. It does not fold up like a pair of scissors; there is no pivot or hinge-pin. Instead, the furniture pulls apart in two pieces, then one piece slides inside the other. It's more like "sword-and-scabbard" furniture.

Whatever you want to call it, the elegant table and chair you see here can be packed up in a small, easy-to-store bundle; then set up again in next to no time. They were built by Jeff and Sandra Walker, who manufacture "casual furniture" in Ravenna, Kentucky, at their business, "Oak Arts." #

PARTS

Materials List

HARDWARE

Scissors Chair

Scissors Table

CHAIR

EXPLODED VIEW

TABLE

EXPLODED VIEW

Materials List

PARTS

Scissors Chair

  1. Long legs (2)
  2. Short legs (2)
  3. Long stretcher
  4. Short Stretcher
  5. Crossbars (2)
  6. Slats (22)

Scissors Table

  1. Legs (4) Vx1*"x19V
  2. Long crossbars(3) Vx1Vx15"
  3. Short crossbar V x 1V x 13 V
  4. Aprons (2) V x 2V x 19V C. Slats(10) Vx1Vx19V

HARDWARE

Scissors Chair

810 x 1V Flathead wood screws (16) 4d Finishing nails (80)

Scissors Table

»10 x 1V Flathead wood screws (16) 4d Finishing nails (40) V x 1V Carriage bolts (2) Va" Flat washers (4) %" Stop nuts (2)

Making the Chair

Cut all parts to size. Choose a clear, durable I hardwood, such as oak or mahogany, to build the scissors chair. The individual parts are very slender. If you make them from softwood, they may break after a short time.

In addition, you'll need hardwcxxl lumber of two different thicknesses — V*" and Mi". The chair requires 7-8 Siftuuv feet of V*" stock, and 5-6 sqtutre feet of W stock. (This estimate is approximate, and may change depending on the widths and lengths of the materials available.)

If you don't have a planer to thickness the stock, have it thicknessed at the lumberyard.

Note: We've estimated the wood needed in square feet rather than the usual board feet. Depending on how your shop is equipped, you may be able to rcsaw and plane this stock from just 10-12 board feet of lumber.

After you have gathered the thicknesses of stock you need, rip and cut all the parts to the sizes shown in the Materials list for the "Scissors Chair."

Cut the shapes of the chair legs. Lay out imm the shapes of the long and short chair legs on V< " stock. Be certain that the grain of the wood is oriented parallel to the length of these parts, so that the finished legs will be as strong as possible. Cut out the shapes of the legs with a band saw or sabre saw, then sand away the saw marks.

77? y 7'Mi 5 ! To save time when marking and cutting the legs, stack the pieces of stock on top of each other, making two "pads" — one for the short legs and one for the long legs. "Pad saw" each of these stacks, cutting two legs at once.

LONG LEG

CUTTING

DIAGRAM

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