Chair Side View

Assemble the crossbars and stretchers to the legs. Scrcw the crossbars to the legs, where shown in the Crossbar Placement Detail. Countersink the screws so that the heads are flush with the surface of the wood. If you wish, you can cover the screw heads with wooden plugs so that you don't see them at all. After you've attached the crossbars, screw the stretchers to the chair legs.

CROSSBAR

PLACEMENT

DETAIL

CHAIR CHAIR

BACK ASSEMBLY SEAT ASSEMBLY

LAYOUT LAYOUT

■CSBORS CHAM AND 1'AUUI

I Nail the slats in place. Nail the slats to the V chair legs where you've marked them. If you can find 4d galvanized finishing nails, use them. If you can't.

order special aluminum or stainless steel nails from a marine supplier.

7 Apply a finish to the completed chair.

If you've built this project from a domestic hardwood, such as oak, it's particularly important that you seal the grain. These woods will decay faster out of doors than the usual "outdoor" woods, like redwood and cedar. Apply spar varnish, or a 1:1 mixture of spar varnish and tung oil.

Making the Table

Cut all parts to sixe. Select a hardw<xxl to I match the wood you used to build the chair. Make die table from 3-4 square feet of5/«" stock, and 3-4 feet of stock. ( These estimates arc approximate, and may change depending on the widths and lengths of the materials available.) If you don't have a planer to thickness the stock, have it thicknessed at the lumberyard.

Note: As we said before, we've estimated the w<xxl needed in square feet rather than the usual board feet. Depending on how your shop is equipped, you may be able to resaw and plane this stock from just 6-8 board feet of lumber.

Rip and cut all the parts to the sizes shown in the Materials list for the "Scissors Table." Miter the ends of the table legs at 45'; and chamfer one corner on one of the long table crossbars, as shown in the working drawings.

7K Y THi3I While you're cutting the table parts, you may also wish to cut a 4" long "bite" out of one slat. Later on, use this as the top slat in the project. It will form a convenient "handle" with which to carry the table.

Drill the table legs and aprons. Drill '/<" Lam holes in the table legs and aprons where they will be attached to each other. Counterbore the holes in the legs so that you can sink the heads of the carriage bolts flush with the surface of the wood. (Sec Figure 2.) These counterbores must be on the inside of each leg.

ICounterbore the pivot holes on the inside of the legs, so that the heads of the carnage bolts will rest flush with the surface of the wood

ICounterbore the pivot holes on the inside of the legs, so that the heads of the carnage bolts will rest flush with the surface of the wood

Sand all parts. Sand the parts, carefully rounding hard edges and corners. As we said before, this will not only make the furniture more comfortable, it will help prevent splinters.

4 Mark the positions of the slats. Carefully mark the positions of the slats on the table aprons. Do this before you start assembling the parts, so that you can mark both aprons at the same time, and get the marks exactly the same on both parts.

Assemble the crossbars and stretchers

\*J to the legs. Screw the crossbars to the legs, where shown in the Side View. Countersink the screws so that the heads are flush with the surface of the wood. If you wish, you can cover the screw heads with wooden plugs so that you don't see them at all.

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