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Tung oil is applied to the surface of a serving trolley. Using a squirt bottle as shown above is a quick and easy way to spread this finish. After being allowed to penetrate the wood for about 15 minutes, the excess oil is wiped from the surface with a rag.

The arbor, planter, and serving trolley presented in this chapter complement the furniture designs featured in previous chapters. The arbor creates a base for climbing plants and a decorative focal point for outdoor recreation or relaxation. Planters can be used to establish flowers or other plantings in any part of a garden. And with its capacity to transport both victuals and kitchen items like plates, dishes, and cutlery, the serving trolley is a welcome convenience for backyard entertaining.

The planter (page 120) is built from white cedar formed into staves. A 3/4-inch piece of marine-grade plywood forms the bottom, and the staves are joined with spline-and-groove joints. A lip around the top edge protects the ends of the staves and adds a decorative element. For an eight-sided planter, the edges of the staves must be beveled at 22/4°. The table-saw jig shown on page 121 will enable you to cut the bevels and taper the staves at the same time so they are wider at the top than at the bottom.

The serving trolley featured on page 126 is built around a frame joined with half-laps and reinforced by glue and screws. The slats on the bottom rest on cleats running along the inside faces of the lower side rails. The top consists of four rails that

Tung oil is applied to the surface of a serving trolley. Using a squirt bottle as shown above is a quick and easy way to spread this finish. After being allowed to penetrate the wood for about 15 minutes, the excess oil is wiped from the surface with a rag.

slip over the frame assembly, and are screwed to the top of the frame. The trolley rolls on two wheels of the type designed for gas barbecues. Indeed, the trolley could be used to replace the often flimsy metal bases provided with many barbecues.

The arbor is built from rough-sawn cedar (page 131). Left without a finish, the wood will turn an attractive silver hue as it weathers. Meanwhile, the natural decay-resistance of cedar will protect the piece from the elements. One practical advantage of leaving the wood bare is that the arbor will never require refinishing—a plus once climbing plants weave themselves into the trellis and around the posts.

The sides of the arbor are built with tusk tenons and joined with half-laps, and the trellises are held in place by cleats. Although the top of the piece is simply nailed to the sides, the project does not skimp on traditional joinery techniques— the arbor shown in the photo at left relies on no fewer than 148 half-lap joints.

Although white cedar was chosen for these projects, other decay-resistant, attractive woods such as redwood and red cedar will work equally well.

Festooned with flowers, the rustic-style arbor shown at left frames a pathway from a backyard garden to a pond. The arbor is made from lattices of rough-sawn 3A-inch northern white cedar assembled with half-lap joinery.

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Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

Have you ever wanted to begin woodworking at home? Woodworking can be a fun, yet dangerous experience if not performed properly. In The Art of Woodworking Beginners Guide, we will show you how to choose everything from saws to hand tools and how to use them properly to avoid ending up in the ER.

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