Anatomy Of A Curved Chair

The curve of the chair shown at left is made possible by using spacers at the back that are twice as long as those at the front. This chair was finished with two coats of primer and one coat of exterior-grade paint. The curved chair featured in this section is built by joining eight identical H-shaped units with steel rods. Each unit is separated from the adjoining one by three 2-inch-diame-ter spacers two at the rear leg and one at the front. The curve is achieved by using l 2-inch-long...

Outdoor Furniture

TIME-LIFE BOOKS ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA THE ART OF WOODWORKING was produced by ST. REMY PRESS Series Editor Series Art Director Senior Editor Editor Art Directors Designers Administrator Production Manager Coordinator System Coordinator Photographer Indexer Kenneth Winchester Pierre L veill Pierre Home-Douglas Francine Lemieux Marc Cassini Andrew Jones Jean-Pierre Bourgeois, Solange Laberge Time-Life Books is a division of Time Life Inc. TIME LIFE INC. President and CEO George Artandi TIME-LIFE...

Treelength Circumference Cap Rail

TREE LENGTH CIRCUMFERENCE CAP RAIL* Calculating the dimensions of a tree bench The size of some tree bench parts the cap rails, aprons, and slats depend on the circumference of the tree. Since the mitered cap rails hug the tree closest, their length along the inside (or shorter) edges is critical. Ideally, there should be a 1 -inch gap between the cap rails and the tree at the midpoint of each rail. Start by measuring the tree's circumference (simply wrap a measuring tape around the trunk at...

How A Table Saw Blade Guard Assembly Works

Protecting fingers and preventing kickback The standard table saw blade guard assembly includes a pivoting, clear-plastic blade guard, which deflects flying wood chips and reduces the chance that fingers will slip accidentally into the blade. The guard is connected to a thin piece of metal known as the splitter or riving knife. Attached directly in line with the blade, the splitter keeps the saw cut or kerf-open. Without such a device, the kerf may close during a cut, binding the blade and...

Cutting tenons in the stretchers

Prepare the stretchers referring to the cutting list, then rabbet their ends to make the tenons. The top stretcher tenon should be 114 inches long to end flush with the legs, while the lower one must be 4 inches long to allow it to hold a tusk pin. To cut the rabbets, install a dado cutting assembly in your table saw and attach a miter gauge extension. Adjust the cutting height to about Yt inch and make a cut in both sides of a piece of scrap stock and test the fit in the open mortise. Fine...

Preparing the staves for the splines

Fit your table saw with a dado head, adjust its width to the spline thickness inch and set the cutting height to Vs inch. Center the edge of a stave over the blades, then butt the rip fence against one face of the stock and clamp a guide board to the saw table against the opposite face. Feed the stave into the head, keeping the outside face flush against the fence (right). To determine the width of the plywood splines, secure two staves upright in handscrews, butt the pieces edge to edge, and...

Fashioning A Curved Chair

One of the units of a curved chair is trimmed to within about 'A inch of the cutting line on the band saw. Once all the pieces are cut, they are pared to final shape with a router fitted with a flush-trimming bit, guided by a template. Mark out a template of the chair units on a piece of plywood or hardboard, referring to the anatomy illustration on page 34 for the profile and dimensions of the pieces. Start by drawing the legs and seating unit with straight lines, then use a thin strip of...

Glossary

Auxiliary fence A wooden attachment to a tool's rip fence that serves to hold accessories or prevent damage to the blade by the metal fence. Axle cap A stamped, unthreaded cap driven onto an axle rod to hold a wheel in place. Backing board A board attached to a drill pass to give the work a larger bearing surface and to prevent tearout. Batten A board stretched across a number of slats or across the grain of a flat surface to increase rigidity and minimize warping. Bevel cut A cut at an angle...

Anatomy Of A Lounge Chair

No deck or patio is complete without at least one lounge chair or chaise longue. Building a couple like the one shown at right and in the color photograph on page 22 involves the better part of a day's work, but the finished products will provide years of comfortable loafing and sun worshipping. The chair is made with almost two dozen slats. Those for the main body are simply screwed to a cleat fastened to the side rails the backrest slats are joined to rails with half-laps. Butt hinges secure...

Making Tusk Tenons

Tusk Tenon Wedge Joint Furniture

2 Roughing out the mortises in the posts You can cut the post mortises by hand, or use a mortiser or a drill press, fitted with either a mortising attachment or a 1-inch-diameter spade bit, as shown at right. The mortises should start 18 inches from the bottom and 24 inches from the top of the posts. Use the finished tenons to lay out the length and width of the mortises, making sure the outlines are centered on the inside faces of the posts. Then clamp a backup panel to your drill press table...

Anatomy Of A Porch Swing

Knockdown Connector Outdoor Wood

Cross dowels are commonly used in knockdown furniture, but their strength and durability make them ideal for outdoor furniture that is not designed to be taken apart. A cross-dowel connector is used to join an arm to an arm post in the chair shown above, providing a much stronger connection than screws could, and saving the task of fashioning a more elaborate joint. The back seat rail is beveled to a 15 to 25 angle, so as to provide a comfortable angle for the seat back. The back is screwed and...

Joinery And Hardware

Joinery presents unique challenges to the outdoor furniture maker. Many of the standard joints used for indoor furniture are incapable of withstanding the abuses wrought by weather. The blind mortise-and-tenon joint, for example, is normally an excellent choice for joining chair rails and legs, but it does not fare well outdoors. Water can become trapped in the mortise, causing the joint to swell and leading to wood decay. A variation on the same joint, the through mortise-and-tenon page 19 ,...

Tenoning Jig For The Table

Tenon Jig Fence

You can use the jig shown at right to cut tenons on the table saw. Adapt the dimensions suggested in the illustration to customize the jig for your saw, if necessary. Cut the jig fence and back from 3 i-inch plywood and saw a 45 bevel at one end of each board the pieces should be wider than the height of your saw's rip fence. Fasten two pieces together face to face to fashion the back, then use countersunk screws to attach the fence and back in an L shape. Make sure the fasteners will not be in...

Anatomy Of A Garden Bench

Bench Back Rails

The garden bench is a sophisticated piece of furniture. Building it demands as much precision and attention to detail as any indoor project. It also incorporates features that give it the needed strength and durability to face the elements. The bottom ends of the arm support and back slats, for example, are housed in dadoes that extend right through the rails, allowing any moisture to drain out. To make the bench, start by assembling the legs and rails, then add the arms and their slats,...

Attaching the arm with cross dowels

Position Cross Dowels Furniture

Cut out the arms on a band saw, referring to the anatomy for their shape. There is both a right and left arm, so be sure not to mix them up. Round over the edges of the arms with a router fitted with a round-over bit. Then use a bevel gauge to transfer the angle of the chair back to the back edge of the arm and make the cut on your table saw. This will allow the arm, which is horizontal, to fit flush against the chair back. Then drill a hole the same diameter as the cross-dowel bolt through the...

Building A Garden Bench

Table Saw Dado Cuts

A dado head on a table saw cuts a dado in the front leg of a garden bench. Each front leg needs three dadoes two on the outside face that match rabbets sawn into the end and stretcher rails, and one on the front edge for a rabbet in the front seat rail. In the setup shown at right, stop blocks clamped to a miter gauge extension ensure that the dadoes in the two legs will be in exactly the same locations. A dado head on a table saw cuts a dado in the front leg of a garden bench. Each front leg...