Identical Handles

To make the handles, a block of walnut approximately 150 by 150 by 32mm (6 by 6 by I % in) is shaped to the profile of the handles, see diagram.The recess for the finger pull is cut using a bearing-guided rebate bit mounted in a router table; take care to enter and exit the handle without removing any material from the ends, see diagram.

Moving to the saw bench, slice off a suitable thickness for a finished 20mm (%in) handle, repeating the process until enough handles are made. I have found American black walnut to be fairly brittle when routed, so I always make up one or two spares just in case anything goes wrong.

Making the handles this way ensures that each one is identical and also that one's fingers are kept away from the cutter. Finally, the square edges are profiled with a small diameter round-over bit, using a simple holding device for safety.

Handle detail showing rebate

until the correct curve was achieved.

I then cut close to the line using a jigsaw then, using a circular plane followed by abrasive paper, smoothed the curve.

Having formed the curve on one side it can be used as a template for the other. As with the door recesses, a router is fitted with a bearing-guided cutter which follows the first side to cut the second.

A solid cherry lipping is biscuit-jointed to the four horizontal carcass members using No. 0 size biscuits. Once this is done they can be cut to size and trimmed for a good fit in the housed sides. Obviously the bottom fixed board will need to be 13mm (Min) shallower than the others to accommodate the doors.

Before gluing up I always do a dry run to ensure that everything is close to hand, that the sash cramps are at the correct length, and that it will all go together square.

With the carcass glued up it's time to make and fit the drawers, see panel.

Hinges are fitted to the carcass and then to the doors; when satisfied with the fit, remove the doors and mark up the curved

ABOVE! Curves set out with string and a pencil cut-out using the pencil and string method outlined above. Using the method of templating one side from the other guarantees a symmetrical result.

Raising the bottom of the doors slightly allows for the thickness of a carpet. Each door is kept shut with two spring-loaded ballbearing cabinet catches.

Handles* shelves

The cabinet is then assembled and the positions for the handles, see panel, marked. These are attached to the drawers with two screws each - the cupboard handles are slightly trickier, being a single handle cut in half;

ABOVE! Curves set out with string and a pencil top left: Drawer detail bottom left:

Copper rod used as adjustable shell supports - holes must be precisely drilled

How the handles are made up

Shape block as shown then slice off handles

20mm thick

Cut here for door handle

30mm f

How the handles are made up

Shape block as shown then slice off handles

Cut here for door handle

30mm f

20mm thick

"I carefully painted the rear of the cabinet with matt black paint to cover the ugly non-show side of the plywood"

BELOW: Front and side elevation this provides less area to take the screws and therefore requires absolute accuracy when drilling.

Also fitted at this stage are the cupboard's two 13mm (Ain) solid cherry height-adjustable shelves, one full depth, the other half depth.

The solid top has a finished thickness of 32mm (l%in) and overhangs the sides and front by 20mm (%in). Before fixing, the square edges of the upper and lower faces are profiled with a Ain bearing-guided round-over router bit.

It is jointed to the top horizontal carcass member with No. 20 biscuits and four No. 8 screws. For economy, the back is made of 10mm one-sided cherry plywood with the good face inside the cabinet.

I carefully painted the rear of the cabinet with matt black paint to cover the ugly, non-show side of the plywood back.

Finish

When happy with the assembled cabinet, take it apart and sand to 320 grit. A coat of linseed oil thinned slightly with white spirit to aid absorption is applied inside and out.

When the oil is dry, give the whole piece a thin brush coat of shellac sanding sealer. When this is dry, wax along the grain with 0000 wire wool, following this with three more coats of wax. Many woods benefit from this form of finish and, although quite slow and laborious, it is my personal favourite. ■

BELOW: Front and side elevation

3 I mm 18mm

152mm

18mm

152mm

18mm

Second edition

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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