Settinglaying out

The two sides to be joined need not be of equal thickness, but the thickness of each must be constant across the width and the long-grain edges must be parallel. It is advisable to cut the ends truly square and to the overall length, as this facilitates the setting out which must be accurately done, but a fractional fullness in the length can be left for subsequent cleaning off. Assuming that the ends have been cut square and to the true length then either a sharp marking-gauge or a cutting-gauge is set to the exact thickness of one piece (154:lA) and gauged all round the end of the other piece (B); the thickness of (B) is then similarly gauged round (A). The spacing of the separate dovetails must now be determined, and while an experienced worker might trust his eye alone the beginner should adopt the following procedure. Determine first the width of the end-grain pins (B) and, assuming that each pin is to be approximately 1/2 in (12.5 mm) in width, gauge a 1/4 in (6 mm) from each parallel edge of 154:6A to accommodate half a pin, and divide the space between into as many divisions as there will be whole pins. If these are, say, four then five divisions are required, and 5 in (127 mm) (or any number of inches [millimetres] easily divisible by five) is measured off on the rule and measured obliquely across the board as shown; the divisions can then be drawn in to give the exact centre of four equally spaced pins.

The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing

The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing

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