Minimum Radii Of Curvature

With support

Without

Timber

ing lnetal

strap

strap

in

mm

in

mm

English ash

2.5

63

12.0

305

English beech

1.5

38

13.0

330

Imported birch

3.0

76

17.0

432

Dutch elm

0.4

10

9.5

241

English oak

2.0

50

13.0

330

Honduras mahogany

12.0

305

28.0

711

Burmah teak

16.0

406

28.0

711

European spruce

30.0

762

No precise data are available for English walnut but the writer has always found mild, straight-grained walnut roughly comparable to oak or beech, ebony fairly malleable and even oily rosewood capable of simple curvatures if taken in several stages. The quoted figures given in the table are taken from the Forest Products Research Taboratory data.

317 Chair in steam bent ash by David Colwell

usually taken to mean several bevelled joints assembled together, as in coopered barrels. Both terms are, therefore, in essence synonymous. Their application is in splay corners and in cylindrical falls, bow fronts, pillars, columns, etc. built up from solid sections and rounded to shape. They can be tongued together, but are more often merely glued, butted together, rubbed or cramped/ clamped and later reinforced with glue blocks, although good joints should not necessarily need them. The usual difficulty is to plane the edges at the required angle. It can be done easily enough on the overhand-planer or jointer with the fence set to the required angle, but hand-planing in a vice and using an adjustable bevel instead of a try-square for testing presents some problems, for it is very easy to lose width if both edges have to be bevelled, thus forming a taper section. A good method is to use support pieces cut at the correct angle temporarily nailed to the planing-board. If the angle of the splay or bevel required is 671/2°, as in building up an octagonal column, then the support pieces must be 221/20 to make up the required 90° at which the plane works (318:3). (Six sides will require angles of 60° and 30°, ten sides 72°

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