Hugh Scriven Furniture

388 The knuckle joint

Pembroke Table Mahogany Classix
gauged line squared chamfer line

table without flaps, 385:2 the sectional elevation and 385:3 an isometric projection of the overall appearance. Figure 385:4 is the usual table with end flaps supported by swing knuckle-jointed brackets as in Pembroke tables, etc., and 385:5 an under plan showing the flap in the raised position. Constructional details are given in 386 with 386:1 the carcass framing, 386:2 leg details from which it will be seen that the side rail is bridled over the upright or standard, with the outer side of the latter cut back as at 386:2A to allow the bracket to fold back. If flaps are not fitted as 386:1 then the outer side can be carried up to the top of the rail, or more neatly finished by setting the rail flush with the legs on the outer face and grooving and screwing the standard (386:2B). The shaped legs are set out full size as shown in 386:7, with the shaded portion left on to facilitate cramping/ clamping up and then cut off after asembly, butt jointed and glued together and mortised for the triangular-shaped tenon of the standard (386:2) which is glued and screwed from the inside. Figure 386:3 is the sectional elevation of a typical drawer front with cock beads, also a reeded edge to the table-top and a small base moulding rebated/rabbeted in, while 386:4 is the rule-joint assembly for the flap, and 386:5 the moulded section of the stretcher rail between the two leg frames. The standard is usually rebated out for an inset capping moulding mitred all round (386:6), while 386:9 shows an alternative method of framing the legs which are tenoned into a block, with a separate moulded capping piece glued on and the standard dowelled in.

Sunderland tables

These worked on the same principle as the Pembroke table, but the tops were narrow and the flaps much deeper, with the result that the tables were not as stable as the Pembroke and, therefore, not so popular. A compromise between the two was sometimes made with large flaps supported by swing legs on the gateleg table principle.

Side tables

This typical side table (389:1) was originally made up as a teak display-table for a very valuable and heavy Tang dynasty pottery horse, but is equally suitable as a serving- or library-table, etc. Figure 389:2 gives the detail of leg, tenoned-in rail and attached top, showing the chamfers worked to relieve the otherwise plain design. The original top was 11/2 in (38 mm) blockboard (obtainable as flush door blanks) veneered and edged, but 389:3 shows an alternative construction with 5/8 in (16 mm) plywood and wide edging, and middle stiffening rail glued on. On practical grounds it can be argued that there is little intrinsic difference between a solid and a built-up top, provided the ply is heavy enough, and the outward appearance must be the same; nevertheless, there is a very subtle difference which the expert eye will be able to detect.

Coffee and occasional tables

The coffee or occasional table as an item of furniture has no parallel in past centuries in the West, although low tables, used mainly for dining purposes, have been in use for many centuries in the Far East. The low table has, therefore, no need to reflect the images of past centuries and can thus afford the designer considerable scope, and has become an item of furniture much favoured by the designer-maker and amateur alike.

As a result, in recent years the coffee table has developed for beyond being a mere surface from which to serve tea or coffee to become an important focal point in many interiors. To meet this new situation, low tables are now often quite large, bold items of furniture, as able to accommodate the buffet supper, large bowls of fruit or flowers as the delicate tea or coffee service. They are increasingly becoming more artistically designed, devised to be looked at and admired in a static position, almost items of sculpture in their own right, rather than flimsy articles to be picked up and used in a flexible way. Flexibility, however, is still an important requirement in many households, particularly in smaller rooms, and hence the popularity of the nest of tables. These tables are light enough to be picked up with one hand and used individually by guests when necessary, but for most of the time they take up very little floor space against a wall.

389 Side table

390 Small side table using contrasting coloured veneers. Designed and made by John Coleman

389 Side table

Construction and materials The constructional methods employed on these tables often echo those of taller dining, writing or side tables. The main point to remember is that, unlike many items of furniture, there are no rules that apply to low tables. They can be circular, square, rectangular or free-formed; the height can be 10 in (25 cm) or 20 in (50 cm), and the top almost any size; the top surface can be of glass, slate, marble, leather, wood or plastic, and it can involve intricate veneer or inlay work, bold use of colour, or simply be a slab of unadorned solid wood; and the possibilities for the structure that supports the surface,are endless. The following pages of line drawings and photographs illustrate the wide variety of possible interpretations.

390 Small side table using contrasting coloured veneers. Designed and made by John Coleman

A table with interior illumination (397) is included to show the principles involved. Figure 397:1 is a plywood box jointed by any suitable method and edged on the top with wider boards (397:4). The sides of the box are cut away at the base as 397:1 to provide ventilation, and an obscured glass inner top is held in position by wood spacers (397:3, 4) to allow for free circulation of air, for most light fittings emit some degree of heat. The 12 in (300 mm) strip light is fixed to a cross-bearer across the centre of the box (397:2, 5), and hidden by the

391 Coffee table in Zebrano veneer, 4 ft 3 in x 1 ft 6 in x 1 ft 2 in (1300 x 450 x 375 mm) high. Designed and made by John Coleman. Photo by Tim Imrie obscured glass inner top. The main top is 6 mm or 9 mm plate glass with four shallow recesses drilled out to provide seatings for the stub metal locating dowels (397:4). The light can be coloured by using any stained glass for the inner top.

JT"

392 (and facing page) Coffee tables

Dining table, Edward Zucca, U.S., 1982. Mahogany, maple, satinwood and ebony. 30 x42 x78in (76 x 107 x 198cm)

Writing desk, designed and made by Rupert Senior and Charles Wheeler-Carmichael, U.K. Wenge

Yellow table, Hugh Scriven, U.K., 1983. Sycamore, stained and painted. The sides are 24in across x l4in high (600x365cm)
Furniture Hugh Scriven

Chest of drawers, John Coleman, U.K. Sycamore and coloured veneers. Access to the drawers is by rebated finger pulls on the outside edge of each drawer

Tapered chest of drawers, 'The Great Art Deco Explosion". John Cederquist, U.S. Bird's-eye maple and colorcore. 64in high, 40in wide, Win deep (163x102x36cm)

Chest of drawers, John Coleman, U.K. Sycamore and coloured veneers. Access to the drawers is by rebated finger pulls on the outside edge of each drawer

Tapered chest of drawers, 'The Great Art Deco Explosion". John Cederquist, U.S. Bird's-eye maple and colorcore. 64in high, 40in wide, Win deep (163x102x36cm)

John Cederquist

Continuous arm chair. Thos. Moser, U.S. The seat and chair back are cherry, the spindles and legs white ash. 41 in high, 23in wide, 17in deep (104x59 x43cm)

Ball and cone chair, Norman Petersen, U.S. Purpleheart wood, lacquered wood, gold and aluminium foil, painted leather. 33x22x21in (84 x 56 x 53cm)

Lady's workbox, designed and made by Edward Hopkins, U.K. Solid pine

Fan-back Windsor arm chair, Michael Dunbar, U.S. Three coats of paint aged to simulate an antique finish
Furniture Construction Methods

one below, in contrast, is of solid wood construction throughout but uses narrow sections glued together, a method that has been exploited in the bold corner and centre joints.

393 & 394 These two large tables were designed and made by Jeremy Broun. The top one has an interesting and intricate top surface built of thin strips of Columbian pine bonded to a fixed core. Simple black inlaid lines complete the design. The one below, in contrast, is of solid wood construction throughout but uses narrow sections glued together, a method that has been exploited in the bold corner and centre joints.

395 Burr walnut table with boxwood inlay. Designed and made by David Field

396 Chess table. Rosewood with burr yew inserts. Designed and made by Desmond Ryan

395 Burr walnut table with boxwood inlay. Designed and made by David Field

396 Chess table. Rosewood with burr yew inserts. Designed and made by Desmond Ryan

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397 Coffee table with glass top

398 Glass top on pedestals of mahogany and Indian laurel. Designed and made by Martin Grierson

398 Glass top on pedestals of mahogany and Indian laurel. Designed and made by Martin Grierson

Desmond Ryan
400 Table in solid oak by Desmond Ryan

401 Circular table in solid cherry with five veneered panels. Designed by Robert Williams for Pearl Dot

Nestling Solid Pedestal
402 Nesting tables in solid elm by Jeremy Broun

403 & 404 Two nests of tables designed and made by Neil Henderson, one (below) in natural solid sycamore, and the other (facing page, above) cut from four pieces of MDF mitred at the corners and sprayed with coloured lacquer

Hugh Scriven Furniture Maker

404 Neil Henderson - Linear '3 in 1' set of tables. Semi-matt coloured lacquer with contrasting line around legs

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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