Es Tenon Detail

2 Using the dimensions for the bottom rail (B) shown in Drawing 6, mark the layout, and cut 3/4"-wide slots in the inside pieces of the bottom rails (B) in the same way you did for the inside pieces of the legs.

3 Glue and clamp the pieces together, and later cut the rails (B, C) to the finished sizes listed in the Materials List.

4 Purchase enough wainscoting for the two end frames. (We purchased ours at a local home center.) Measure the thickness of the wainscoting. (Ours measured 5/i6M-thick.) Now, use a router and a straight bit or a dado blade to cut a groove centered along the inside edge of each leg. Whether using the tablesaw or a table-mounted router, you'll need to use stops to end the grooves at the mortises. The groove needs to be as wide as your wainscoting is thick. If you rout the grooves, do it in several passes, raising the bit each pass. Don't try to rout the grooves in one pass.

5 Cut or rout a groove to the same width centered along the top edge of the bottom rails (B), where shown on Drawing 3a. Then, cut the same width of groove 1V4" deep along the bottom edge of the top rails (C).

6 Using the dimensions on the Top Rail Pattern on Drawing 6, cut the tenons on each end of each rail.

7 Again referring to Drawing 6, cut and sand the bottom edge of the top rails (C) to shape.

% x 31/2"

dado %" deep

  • quot; plug 5/i6" long / #8 x 2" F.H. wood screw 25%"
  • 8 x 2" F.H. wood screw
  • 4" pilot hole 11/2" deep
  • 8 x 2" F.H. wood screw
  • 4" pilot hole 11/2" deep
  • quot; plug 5/i6" long
Wooden Screws

Vie" chamfer on both ends of all dowels counterbore Vi" deep with a 5/32" hole centered inside

5/i6 x 3'/2n carriage bolt

  • quot; plug 5/ie" long
  • quot; plug 5/i6" long
  • 8 x 2" F.H. wood screw;
  • quot; plug y,6" long

Vie" chamfer on both ends of all dowels counterbore Vi" deep with a 5/32" hole centered inside

5/i6 x 3'/2n carriage bolt

Crosscut the oak wainscoting (D) to length.

Now, let's assemble the end frames

1 Dry-clamp (no glue) each end frame to check the fit. You'll need to trim the outside edge of each outside piece of wainscoting. The outside edges of the wainscoting should protrude into the 3/s"-deep groove about 5/i6M. Also, mark the taper cutline on the bottom of each leg so the top end of the taper stops just below the point where the bottom rail (B) meets the leg (A).

2 Cut the tapers, and sand to remove the saw marks.

3 As shown in Photo B, glue and clamp each end frame together, checking for square. (We ran a thin bead of glue in the grooves in the bottom and top rails to keep the wainscoting from rattling in the finished frame. Be careful to minimize squeeze-out. We did not glue the tongue-and-groove joints between the individual wainscoting pieces.) Wipe off all excess glue with a damp cloth.

4 Cut the armrests (E) to size. Check that the top edge of the assembled end frame is flat; then glue and clamp an armrest to the top of each frame. The inside edge of each armrest is flush with the inside surface of each end frame, and the armrests are centered front to back on the top edge of each end frame.

Cut a pair of rails

ICut and laminate W-thick stock for the front and rear rails (F) just like you did for the legs (A).

2 Trim the rails to finished size, and cut a tenon on each end of each rail to the size shown on Drawing 1a. For proper clearance of the assembled seat and backrest assemblies between the end frames, keep the distance between the tenon shoulders 75", as dimensioned on Drawing 1.

3Set the rails aside; you'll use them to join the end frames later.

0 end section

Futon mattress size = 8 x 54 x 75" (full size)

Sofa position

Bed position

To reposition from a bed to a sofa: Pull front rail (K)to move seat/backrest forward (about 1 y2TLift backrest to full raised seat position.

To change from a sofa to a bed: Lift front rail ® about 2" and pull forward. Once seat/backrest assembly is flat, push seat/backrest back (about 1V2") to lock in position, preventing seat/backrest from folding.

Sofa Backrest Angle

Futon mattress size = 8 x 54 x 75" (full size)

Sofa position

Bed position

To reposition from a bed to a sofa: Pull front rail (K)to move seat/backrest forward (about 1 y2TLift backrest to full raised seat position.

To change from a sofa to a bed: Lift front rail ® about 2" and pull forward. Once seat/backrest assembly is flat, push seat/backrest back (about 1V2") to lock in position, preventing seat/backrest from folding.

The backrest uprights come next

ICut and laminate 3/4"-thick stock to form the backrest uprights (G). Cut the uprights to finished size, miter-cut-ting the bottom ends at 25°, where shown on Drawing 6.

2 Clamp the uprights edge-to-edge, and use a square to lay out the cen-terpoints for the holes on the outside face of each.

3On the inside face of each, mark the location for the stopped rabbet and dado.

4Remove the clamps, and drill the holes to the correct sizes where marked.

5 Cut the V/2" dado W deep in each where marked. (We did this on a tablesaw fitted with'a dado blade.) Then, cut the 1/2" rabbet 3A" deep where marked. (We did this on a table-mounted router fitted with a straight bit.)

Cut pieces, assemble the seat and backrest

ICut and laminate W-thick stock to form the l'/2"-thick seat ends (H), backrest bottom and top crossmembers (I, J), and seat crossmembers (K).

2 Cut the pieces (H, I, J, K) to the finished sizes listed in the Materials List. For a proper fit of the seat and backrest assemblies between the end frames, be careful to cut crossmembers I, J, and

K to the exact lengths listed in the Materials List.

3 Cut a rabbet across each end of parts I and K, where dimensioned on Drawing 4.

4 Measure the exact thickness of the V2" AB plywood that you'll use for the backrest and seat panels (L, M). (To keep the overall weight down, we used Vi" stock for the panels. If you have trouble finding this thickness of sheet goods, you may have to use 3/i"-thick stock.)

5 Cut a rabbet along the top edges of parts H, I, J, and K, where dimensioned on Drawing 4.

6 Glue and screw the backrest frame (G, I, I) together, checking for square. Measure the opening, and cut the backrest panel (L) to fit. Set it in place. Check for square again. For bind-free movement of the backrest and seat assemblies between the end frames later, each assembly must be square. Drill countersunk mounting holes, and glue and screw the backrest panel in place.

7 Repeat the process just described to glue, clamp, and screw together the seat assembly (H, K, M).

8Use a plug cutter to cut sixteen %" plugs 5/i6M long. Glue a plug into each counterbore. Later on, sand the plugs flush.

9 Position the seat assembly between the miter-cut ends of the backrest uprights (G). Use the previously drilled holes in the uprights as guides to drill mating 5/i6M holes in the seat ends (H), 21/4" in from the ends, where dimensioned on Drawing 4.

It's time to add the finish, assemble, and relax

1 Finish-sand the end frames, rails, backrest, and seat.

2 Crosscut four pieces of W dowel to 21/4" long. Sand a slight chamfer on each end, and glue them in place in the backrest, where shown on Drawing 4.

3 Apply a clear finish to all parts. (We used a semigloss lacquer.)

4Now use a pair of 5/i6M carriage bolts, 31/2" long with flat washers and lock-nuts, to connect the sofa's backrest to the seat assembly.

5 Referring to Drawing 1a, cut four pieces of 1" angle iron to 2Vi' long. Drill three holes in each, where shown on the detail. Sand or file the pieces to remove the burrs.

6 Drill mounting holes, and screw an angle-iron brace to the ends of each rail (F).

2 Position one end frame inside face up on your workbench or on a blanket on the floor, depending on the available clearance from the floor to the ceiling. Set the rails (F) in their mating mortises. Using the angle-iron braces as guides, mark the location of the hanger-bolt hole on each leg (A).

Remove the rails, and drill the hanger-bolt mounting holes where marked. Repeat this step to mark and drill holes in the opposite end frame.

8Double-nut four 5/i6M hanger bolts 2" long, and thread them into their mating holes in the legs. Remove the nuts.

9 Fit (no glue yet) the rails (F) to one end frame, sliding the angle-iron brace onto the hanger bolts protruding from each end-frame leg. Secure the braces to the legs and hanger bolts with 5/i6" lock nuts.

With the assistance of a helper, position the backrest/seat assemblies face down on your workbench. (We used a pad to protect the finish.) Then, position the end frame/rail assembly so the dowels in the backrest fit into the slots in the end frame. Now, position the opposite end frame in place. Thread the locknuts onto the hanger bolts to secure the second end frame to the assembly.

nTo prevent fingers from getting pinched when raising and level ing the seat and backrest assembly, cut a pair of stops (N) to size. Drill a pair of countersunk mounting holes in each, sand, finish, and screw one stop to the bottom edge of each seat end (H), 4" from the front edge of K, where shown on Drawing 1.

For seating, position the seat and backrest in the configuration shown on Drawing 5 (Sofa position). In the sofa position, keep the back edge of the futon frame 10" from the wall for clearance. For sleeping, simply lift the front seat crossmember (K) and pull forward. Once the seat and backrest assemblies lie flat, push the entire assembly backward about Wi" so the dowels in the backrest uprights (G) lock in place in the grooves in the rear legs (A), where shown on Drawing 5 (Bed position) .#

Written by Marlen Kemmet Project design: James R. Downing Illustrations: Kim Downing; Lorna Johnson

Photographs: King Au

End Frames

FINISHED SIZE

T W L Matt City.

A* legs

11/2"

31/4"

201/4"

LO

4

B* bottom rails

IV2"

5'/2"

25%"

LO

IT

C* top rails

11/2"

2%"

25%"

TcT

2

D wainscoting

Vre"

3*6"

7y8"

OW

IfT

E armrests

%"

3'/4"

35'/4'

2

R3ils

F* front & rear rails

IV2"

21/2"

761/2"

LO

2

Backrest & Seat

G* backrest upright

I1/2"

2W

34y8"

LO

2

H* seat ends

11/2"

2'/2"

25y8*

LO

I* backrest top crossmbr. Vh'

21/2"

741/2"

LO

T

J* crossmember

11/2"

2'/2"

73"

LO

1

K* seat crossmember

I1/2"

2'/2"

71%"

LO

L backrest panel

1/2"

22ya"

73"

OP

M seat panel

1/2"

25%"

69%"

OP

1

N stops

W

11/2"

6"

0

2

"Parts initially cut oversize. See the instructions.

Materials key: LO-laminated oak, OW-oak wainscoting, O-oak, OP-oak plywood.

"Parts initially cut oversize. See the instructions.

Materials key: LO-laminated oak, OW-oak wainscoting, O-oak, OP-oak plywood.

Supplies: #8x1", #8x1 vfe", and #8x2" flathead wood screws; Vie" hanger bolts 2" long (4), 5/ie" carriage bolts 3V4" long (2); Vie" washers; Vie" lock nuts (8); Vie" lag screws I1// long (8); %" hardwood dowel; 1x1x21/2" angle iron (4); clear finish.

Cutting Diagram i ii

syT^sn I

% X 111/4 x 72" Oak

1/2 x 48 x 96" Oak plywood

/

IS

L

f5 5

  • iroora .b d) c c tr
  • i; m v> ZJ

PARTS VIEW

Vi?" rabbet deep stopped at dado holes 1 Vi" deep on outside face

BACKREST UPRIGHT (Side view) (2 needed)

3A" counterbore 1/s" deep (on outside face) with a Vie" hole centered inside

Vi?" rabbet deep stopped at dado holes 1 Vi" deep on outside face

3A" counterbore 1/s" deep (on outside face) with a Vie" hole centered inside

BACKREST UPRIGHT (Side view) (2 needed)

counterbores W deep (on outside face) with a 5/32m hole centered inside

counterbores W deep (on outside face) with a 5/32m hole centered inside

Tables come in all shapes and sizes, and can be used everywhere. Here comes a variety of solid, good-looking projects that will make a statement on behalf of your craftsmanship in just about every room.

Whether or not you've built the accompanying futon in the previous article, you'll enjoy making and using this stylish coffee table. Naturally finished oak provides sturdy good looks, and our plans for solid construction ensure a lifetime of service,

Start by forming the legs

ITo form the lW'-thick legs (A), shown on Drawing 1, cut 16 pieces of 3Z"-thick oak to 3'A" wide by 17" long. (Because 1 '/¡"-thick oak can be difficult to find, we laminated two pieces of3/" stock to form the l'/2"-thick legs.)

2 With the edges and ends flush, glue and clamp two pieces face-to-face to form each of the eight legs. Cut or plane both edges of each leg for a 35/i6" width. (You'll bevel-rip it to exact width later). Trim both ends of each leg for the 16lA" finished length.

3 Hold the eight leg sections together face-to-face with the ends flush. Using Drawing 1 for reference, use a square to mark the mortise and groove locations on the inside edge of each leg. Use the square to verify that the marked mortises align.

4Use your drill press, fence, and a Forstner bit centered over the joint line to drill 3Z" holes 13/i6" deep to remove most of the stock from each marked mortise, as shown in Photo A. Chisel the mortise corners square.

Bevel-rip the legs, and add the splines

ITilt your tablesaw blade to 45°, and bevel-rip one edge (the edge opposite the mortises) of each leg, cutting the leg to its final width of 31/", where shown on Drawing 2 on page 26.

2 Leave your tablesaw blade set at 45°, and cut a '/" spline slot '/" deep along the bevel-ripped edge of each leg, where shown on Drawings 3 and 6a.

3Cut four pieces of '/"-thick stock to l5/i6Xl6'Z" to form the four splines. Next, glue and clamp the mating pieces (A) for each leg, as shown in Photo B on page 26. Keep the leg ends flush and the miter joints tight when gluing and clamping.

Next, machine the rails and wainscoting

ITo form the 1'/"-thick bottom and top rails (B, C, D, E), cut 3/"-thick stock to the sizes listed in the Materials List plus '/" in width and '/" in length.

2 Glue and clamp the pieces together the same way you laminated the leg pieces earlier. Later, cut the rails (B, C, D, E) to the width and then, the length listed in the Materials List and shown on Drawing 5.

3 Purchase enough oak wainscoting for the front, back, and end frames. (We purchased ours at a local home center.) Measure the thickness of the wainscoting. (Ours measured V\6" thick.) Now, use a router and a straight bit to cut a 5/i6" groove centered along the inside

Remove most of the waste from the marked mortises with a Forstner bit, using a fence and stops on your drill-press table for alignment.

- Fence

Saw blade

edge of each leg. Use a stop to end the groove at the mortises. The groove must be as wide as your wainscoting is thick.

4Cut a 5/i6" groove I'A" deep centered along the bottom edge of the top rails (B, D). If you rout this groove, do it in several passes, raising the bit each pass. Do not attempt to rout the l!<&"-deep groove in one pass because you might snap the bit. Then, cut or rout a 5/V' groove Vs" deep centered along the top edge of the bottom rails (C, E).

5 Using the dimensions for the tenons on Drawing 4a and those for the rails (B, C, D, E) on Drawing 5, cut the tenons on each end of each rail.

6 Transfer the pattern from Drawing 5, mark the curved cutline, and cut and sand the bottom edge of the top rails (B, D) to shape.

2 Crosscut the oak wainscoting (F) to length. Finish-sand both surfaces of each piece.

Assemble the end frames

1 Dry-clamp (no glue) the front and back frames (A, B, C, F) to check the fit. You'll need to trim the outside edge of each end piece of wainscoting. The outside edges should protrude into the Vs"-deep groove about 5/i6". Mark the taper cutline on the bottom of each leg so the top end of the taper stops just below the point where the bottom rail (C) meets the legs (A).

2 Cut the tapers, and sand to remove the saw marks.

3Glue and clamp the two frames together, checking for square. (We did not glue the tongue-and-groove joints between the individual wainscoting pieces, nor did we find it necessary to glue the wainscoting in the grooves.)

4To house the continuous hinge later, cut a 3/4" rabbet W deep along the top back edge of the back panel, where shown on Drawing 6 and accompanying Drawing 6b.

5 Check the fit of the remaining rails and wainscoting (D, E, F) between the assembled front and back frames. Trim the outside edge of each end piece of wainscoting, and then glue and clamp the pieces in place.

6Cut the cleats (G, H) to size. Drill countersunk mounting holes, and glue and screw them in place flush with the bottom edge of the bottom rails (C, E).

7 Measure the opening, and cut the 'A" plywood bottom (I) to size. Drill mounting holes along the edges, fit it in place, drill pilot holes into the cleats, and screw the bottom (I) in place.

Now, let's make the lid

1 Using the straightest and flattest boards available, edge-join enough stock to form a blank measuring 25x49" for the lid (J). To help align the boards, you may want to spline or biscuit-join the mating edges of each board.

2 Keeping the boards flat, glue and clamp them together, edge-to-edge.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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Responses

  • bodo
    How to make a Tenon detailed?
    2 months ago

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