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Cut the two sides (A) and apply wood veneer iron-on edge tape to one long edge on each panel. These finished edges will be the fronts.

The sides are joined to the bottom board using glue and screws, dowels or biscuits. I've decided to use biscuits for my project.

Tape one long edge on the upper rail. This will be the downside or exposed edge of the rail. It's attached with glue and a right-angle bracket on each end. The rail face is flush with the outside edges of the sides and even with their tops.

The bottom board (B) also requires one long edge be taped. Trimming some wood veneers, such as oak, can be difficult. The wood grain is wide and the tape can split along the fibers. To prevent this, use a router equipped with a flush-trim bit. Be sure to hold the router flat on the board and the edge will be perfect.

I use a full %"-thlck back on this cabinet because of the potential weight in the drawer. Before installing, tape the two outside vertical edges with veneer tape. The back is applied with glue and screws, dowels or biscuits. I am using screws because the back will be against a wall and therefore not visible. If the back of your cabinet is exposed, use dowels or biscuits and glue. You can use screws but the holes must be counterbored and filled with wood plugs or buttons.

For projects using %" or3// sheet goods, which are to be joined with biscuits, I always use a No. 10 biscuit. The No. 20 setting may cut too deep and there is a possibility the outside of the board can be punctured.

r CK1 Construct the base w'tln 1 x2 sol'd wood' The corners are mitered at f 1 LU J 45° and secured with glue and brad nails. L ' J

Clamp the base In place on the underside of the bottom board. It should be 2" in from all edges of the cabinet. Trace its position and drill holes through the bottom board. Apply glue to the base and set the frame in place. Using the previously drilled holes as references, drill pilot holes into the base from the top side of the bottom board. Secure the frame to the bottom board with two 1W screws on the back, front and two sides.

[" O 1 The top is made with an %"-thlck veneer PB center and framed with T Q1 L^J 1%"-wlde hardwood. The hardwood frame measurements are given for L^? J

Secure the wood edge strips to the top board using No. 20 biscuits and glue. After checking the fit, cutting the biscuit slots and applying the inside-to-inside 45°-angled cut on each piece. glue, clamp the assembly together until the adhesive sets.

Sand the top smooth, being careful not to damage the veneer layer. Round over the top and bottom edges with aroundover bit.

Construct the base with 1x2 solid wood. The corners are mitered at 45° and secured with glue and brad nails.

m Clamp the base In place on the underside of the bottom board. It should be 2" In from all edges of the cabinet. Trace its position and drill holes through the bottom board. Apply glue to the base and set the frame In place. Using the previously drilled holes as references, drill pilot holes Into the base from the top side of the bottom board. Secure the frame to the bottom board with two 1 A" screws on the back, front and two sides.

The top Is made with an %"-thick veneer PB center and framed with 1/2--wide hardwood. The hardwood frame measurements are given for the inside-to-inside 45°-angled cut on each piece.

[Q] Secure the wood edge strips to the top board using No. 20 biscuits L *J J and glue. After checking the fit, cutting the biscuit slots and applying glue, clamp the assembly together until the adhesive sets.

Sand the top smooth, being careful not to damage the veneer layer. Round over the top and bottom edges with a %" roundover bit.

The 16" drawer glides should be the full-extension type so files can be easily and fully accessed. Side-mounted glides from Accuride or bottom-mounted hardware from Blum are two examples of the hardware I use. Install the glides according to the manufacturer's instructions, leaving a 2" space between the top edge of the bottom drawer and the bottom of the top drawer.

Install a 36"-long by "Hi'-wide by ^"-thick piece of aluminum flat stock on the inside of each front and back drawer board. This flat stock can be purchased at most hardware stores. The metal is secured with 5/s"-long screws in countersunk holes drilled in the flat stock. Each strip should be %" above the drawer edge so the hanging folders can slide freely along the track.

Glue and nail the hardwood edge strips for the drawer faces in place. I used simple butt joints at each corner; however, they can be cut at 45° to match the top if you wish. Then sand the faces smooth, taking care not to sand through the wood veneer. Use a %" roundover bit to soften the outside edges on each drawer face. Locate and drill the drawer handle holes in the drawer face only. Align the bottom drawer face flush with the underside of the bottom board. Use 2" screws driven through the handle holes into the drawer box to secure the face temporarily. Open the drawer and drive a 1" screw into the drawer face from the inside of the drawer box at each corner. Finally, remove the screws in the handle holes and complete the drilling so the handles can be installed. Repeat the process for the top drawer face, leaving Xs" between the two faces.

O As mentioned in the introduction, I finished my cabinet with three coats of oil-^^ based polyurethane. However, the veneers and solid wood will look great with a stain or water-based clear coat. If you plan on painting your lile cabinet, p consider using the less expensive poplar veneers and solid wood or MDF. ■M The wood-edged top and drawer faces are another area that can be

p. modified. Use the wood-edged laminate method, such as was detailed in q chapter two, if you want a unique pattern. The GP laminates are very tough t l and will stand up to more abuse than wood veneers.

You can also opt for a solid wood top. They are made by edge gluing boards, using biscuits. The solid wood tops are beautiful and durable.

The cabinet width, as well as its height and number ol drawers, are easily modilied to suit your needs. If you have different subjects in your file system, you may want three 24"-wide drawers to betler separale the information. The construclion methods are the same no matter what design you choose.

The hanging file folders I found in my local stationery store appeared to be all the same width. However, before building the cabinet I suggest you check the lolders in your area. I don't suspect they would be different but it's worth the time to be sure.

And finally, the cabinet can be mounted on the 1X"-high base or on wheels as I mentioned in the introduction. The base height is variable and doesn't affect any other dimension. If you live in an older home with high baseboards, you might wanl to alter the size. If the baseboard frame clears the trim it will allow the cabinet to sit tightly against a wall. By doing that, the cabinet-to-wall gap is eliminated and you won'l have papers falling off Ihe back.

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