Woodworking materials

A surprisingly complete record of carpentry in ancient Egypt can be pieced together through examining tomb scenes, archaeological excavations and discovered materials. From the earliest times basic ideas were turned into tangible products, setting the design principles that are still followed thousands of years later. The properties of timber were understood and tools were developed to work it. At first these were basic hand tools, but then specialised tools and cutting aids were produced....

Joints

In many Predynastic burials the crouched body was placed in a simple box or on a frame of wood which had been covered with plant stems. Much of this early timber has decayed but from surviving pieces showing the corners and edges it is possible to identify a number of woodworking joints. The majority of boxes have butt-jointed corners held together with wooden pegs or tied with n. Butt-joint. 12. Box and frame corner joints a, half-lap b, simple mitre c, shoulder-mitre d, double shoulder-mitre...

Reliefs and wall paintings

The few bed-frames and illustrations of early seats discovered in tombs of the Early Dynastic Period indicate the kind of furniture commonly used then. All of these pieces of furniture would probably have been found in the houses of both middle and high ranking officials and their families. By the Third Dynasty, which marks the beginning of the Old Kingdom, major advances in building construction and the associated trades of woodworking and furniture manufacture are seen. The improvement in the...

Egyptian Woodworking and Furniture

Egyptian Furniture

Box, Eighteenth Dynasty, tomb of Perpaut, Thebes. Durham University Oriental Museum, 1460. Photograph reproduced by courtesy of Durham University Oriental Museum. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Killen, Geoffrey Egyptian Woodworking and Furniture. - Shire Egyptology Series No. 21 I. Title. II. Series 749. 2932 ISBN 0-7478-0239-4 Published in 1994 by SHIRE PUBLICATIONS LTD Cromwell House, Church Street, Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire HP27 9AJ, UK. All rights reserved. No...

The furniture of Queen Hetepheres

Bracelet Queen Hetepheres

In 1925 George Reisner, an American Egyptologist, discovered the furniture of Queen Hetepheres at the bottom of a deep shaft close to her son Khufu's pyramid at Giza. Her body was not found in this small chamber, leading Reisner to believe that the tomb where she had originally lain had been robbed and her body stolen shortly after her death. The contents of that tomb were moved to this second chamber, which would have been under tighter security, being within the Great Pyramid complex. Queen...

List of illustrations

Steam bending, tomb of Baqt III, Beni Hasan page 8 2. Ivory leg from tomb of Djer, First Dynasty, Abydos page 9 3. Carpenter's basket, Twenty-second Dynasty, Lahunpage 10 4. Reed wig box, New Kingdom page 11 5. Sehefner seated on a cushion, Second Dynasty, Saqqara page 11 6. Woodcutters, tomb of Khnum-hotep III, Beni Hasan page 12 7. Carpenter working with pullsaw, tomb of Rekhmire, Eighteenth Dynasty, 8. Timber conversion using 'through and through' cutting page 13 9. Cupping of timber...

Lattice Stool Egypt

Egyptian Round Legged Stool

Stools would have been the most widely used pieces of household furniture. Egyptians used a number of different types of stool and the quality depended upon the rank of its owner. The lattice stool was probably the most popular with all classes of Egyptians and is widely illustrated in Theban tomb scenes. The construction of the stool is very elegant, having four slender legs into which are jointed at the bottom a cross rail and at the top a curved seat rail. The space below the seat on all...