Oak Chimneypiece

Removed from a former house of Sir Orlando Bridgman Coventry. Now in the Refectory at Bablake Schools, Coventry. Width S ft. ii ins. outside jambs. Early seventeenth century.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE, PLASTER OVERMANTEL IN THE LONG GALLERY

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. PLASTER OVERMANTEL IN THE KNIGHT'S ROOM.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. PLASTER OVERMANTEL IN THE STONE PARLOUR.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. PLASTER OVERMANTEL IN THE STONE PARLOUR.

the house came into Beckingham's possession. It is not rare, however, to find the royal arms used in the decoration of houses which have never been in the possession of a king, and this may be an instance, especially as the H.R. is reversed, and another coat, probably that of Beckingham, is introduced in the lower central panel. It is probable that the carved date is the true one, and the Royal Arms were inserted as a memento of the gift, or sale of the house. The purchase price, if any, must have been very low, as Henry disposed of the monastic possessions immediately they fell into his hands, and at any price. It has always been difficult to dispose of stolen goods to advantage, and Henn YIII furnished no exception to the rule. The results of his spoils were all dissipated in a few years, and the King had to turn to other sources to furnish the means for his unbounded extravagance.

This fragment evidently formed a part of the panelling over a mantel, but it is doubtful if the rest of the room was on a similarly elaborate scale. The caning is of fine quality, well designed, under strong influence from Burgundian sources. It may have been the work of some of the Walloon craftsmen who settled in Essex and Suffolk

LYME PARK, D1SLEY, CHESHIRE. SIR PIERS LEGH'S ENTRANCE IN LEONPS HOUSE.

LYME PARK, D1SLEY, CHESHIRE. SIR PIERS LEGH'S ENTRANCE IN LEONPS HOUSE.

Capt. the Hon. Richard Legh.

at this period. That the panelling was made in England is almost certain ; the wood is a quartered English oak, and the constructional details are not foreign.

At Holywells, Ipswich, Mr. John D. Cobbold has gathered together a very fine collection of elaborate panellings and woodwork, taken from Ipswich inns and houses which have been demolished during recent years. From the Neptune Inn, in 1913, came the rich linenfold panelling shown here in Fig. 283. It has been restored and added to, and the capping-rail is modern. One of the original sections illustrated here measures 9 ft. qf ins. in width and 5 ft. 6-|- ins. in height. The addition, which can be seen on the extreme left hand, in the photograph, has been frankly made, without any attempt at concealment. These linen panels, with their Italian frieze, date from about 1540. Fig. 284 shows a portion to a larger scale. It will be noticed here, as in the Beckingham panelling, that the panel mouldings are truly mitred, instead of the mitres being worked in the solid, in the stonemason's manner.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. LEONI'S CENTRAL COURTYARD.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. LEONI'S CENTRAL COURTYARD.

Examples of carved Renaissance panels from the Study at Holywells, removed from the Tankard Inn, are illustrated in Figs. 285 to 291. The framings have been altered and adapted to fit the room, but the integrity of the panels has been preserved. Some of these are exceedingly quaint. Thus in the lower panel on the right of Fig. 285 is a representation of the tempting of Christ by the Devil. The one on the left of this has a shield, with a coat of arms, the same being repeated on the left-hand side of the door. The device below this second coat appears to suggest an original owner's initial. It is ob\ iously improbable that this rich panelling . was made for an inn (in fact, it is known that much, if not all, came from the house of Sir Thomas Wingfield in Ipswich, whose device, a double wing, appears on the lower panel on the left of the door in Fig. 285) We have seen, however, that Mistress Quickly 1 9 I V ^H refers to tapestries in the dining-rooms of

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