M M Office of Wolks

westminster, J w

Elevation ¡of 1>AY

Jfru/j

V/ECTION C C

Fig. 91. WESTMINSTER HALL.

view of a bay and plax of hal1.. frnm an original measured and detailed drawing by Ernest R. Gribble and \V. Rennie, 1910.

may be of service in giving some idea of the gigantic dimensions of the timbers in this wonderful roof:

Cross

Section. Length.

Hammer-beams

. 21"

X24V

21' 0"

Hammer-post

■ 25"

X24r

21' 6"

(at abutment 38-i")

Collar-beam (of two members)

22"

XI2"

40' 0"

Lower principal rafter

. 16I-"

XI3"

26' 4"

Upper principal rafter

. 16"

XI2"

28' 6"

Arch-rib

■ 9"

XI2"

15' 0" to 20' 0"

Lamination of rib .

. 8"

XI2"

Inner bracing-rib

■ 9"

XI3"

14' 3" maximum

Wall-plate (compound) .

• 15"

x 8"

15' 0" to 18' 0"

LTpper and lower purlins

• 9"

x 16V

17' 6"

Main purlins (consisting of 4 members)

Top inner

• 14"

x 12"

Top outer Laminating purlin .

• 13" . 22"

X 10" X 9"

iS' 10"

Lower

X 9" .

Common rafters (laid flat)

. 8"

x 6"

26' 0" to 32' 0"

Wall-posts

• 241"

x iG "

20' 0"

Wind-braces

• 5"

thick

10' 6"

Ridge

• 14"

XII"

17' 9"

Crown-post

• 13"

> 12"

23' 9"

Queen-posts

—•

11' 3"

Some idea of the enormous weight of the timber in this roof, which is supported almost entirely from the wall-heads, may be gathered from the fact that a single hammer-post measuring 38J. ins. by 25 ins. in section at abutment, with a length of 21 ft. 6 ins., weighs three and a half tons. This sectional measurement is also not the maximum one. Actually the hammer-post must have been fashioned from a trunk nearly 4 ft. in diameter.

With Westminster Hall, this review of the English timber roof can be fittingly' concluded. Here, almost in the heart of London, we have the greatest triumph of mediaeval carpentry which England has ever possessed, a testimony alike to the fourteenth-century woodworker and to the qualities of English oak.

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