XjRttMfHBBBflEI her tavern but these as Falstaff suggests

were probably old, " fly-bitten " and worthless. The panel mouldings of Fig. 286 are modern ; those of Fig. 287 show the original sections, Fig. 288 has the initials " N.A."1 in Gothic letters, suspended from a knotted rope,2 elaborately intertwined in the branches of a tree, beneath which are two figures, which may represent Adam and Eve. Below, the device of Sir Thomas \\ ingfield appears again. The panel mouldings and framings here, also, are modern.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE. THE ENTRANCE FRONT OF THE OLD HOUSE.

Detail.

2 A festooned cord (although not of the same interlacing as in this panel) was the device of Anne of Brittany, the consort of two French Kings, Charles VIII (who met his death, so tradition says, by knocking his head against the lintel of a low door in a terrace wall at Vmboise), and his cousin and successor, Louis XII. This festooned cord, alternating -with the ermine, may be seen in the exquisite little oratory built as an addition to Loches, in Touraine, by Charles VIII, and which bears the name of his Queen.

OAK OVERDOOR FROM ROTHERWAS, HEREFORD.

That these carved panels were made for the one room, in the original instance, is highly probable ; they are, in no sense, pieces from several sources collected together. That rich panellings of this kind were not made at one period, but were added to, from time to time, frequently over a considerable space of years, there is considerable evidence to show. At Great Fulford, as we have seen, many of the panels are dated, and in c. j. Charles, Esq.

Fig. 289, above the door, the escutcheon, as in Fig. 285, is here impaled with another, probably to indicate a marriage, in which case the added coat would be. that of the husband. There is, possibly, a good deal of significance in the designing of this panel, but without an authenticated history of the woodwork, the meaning of the devices, such as the knotted rope, repeated again here, must remain obscure.

The turned balusters which support the canopy of the mantel, Fig. 290, are original to the shelf-line. The central panel represents quaint scenes, probably from mythological history, among others, the Judgment of Paris. Escutcheons are shown again in the lower panels of Fig. 291, the coat 011 the sinister side of the overdoor, Fig. 289, here impaled with another, probably to commemorate a second marriage alliance.

The \ icars' Hall, or to give it its full title, the Hall of the Vicars Choral, is now a mere fragment of a building in South Street, Exeter. Above the door is the legend " Aula Collegii Yicariorum de Choro," which conveys to the Latinist an idea of the purpose for which it was built. It formed part of the property, if not of the Cathedral Church,—which is now reached through the later archway at the side,- certainly of the \ icars who officiated at the services. It was customary-, in the Middle Ages, for a

OAK OVERDOOR FROM ROTHERWAS, HEREFORD.

Carved with the arms of liodenham quartering Baskerville. Late sixteenth century.

Fig. 308

TISSINGTON HALL, DERBYSHIRE. PANELLING IN THE HALL.

Early seventeenth century.

Fig. 308

TISSINGTON HALL, DERBYSHIRE. PANELLING IN THE HALL.

Early seventeenth century.

LYME PARK, CHESHIRE.

Panelling now in the drawing-room, formerly in the long gallery. Early seventeenth century.

Capt. the Hon. Richard Legh.

2 N 273

OAK PILASTERS.

Removed from a house at Exeter. c. 1600. Victoria and Albert Museum.

OAK PILASTER.

From a house in Lime St.,

City of London. Earl)' seventeenth century.

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

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