Enlarged Detail Of

illustrated here with a set purpose, to illustrate the decorative limits to which the timber house attained.

With the timber house, as necessary adjuncts, examples of exterior porches, doors, bay windows, and interior decorated beam-ceilings are given. Lengthy descriptions are unnecessary ; the illustrations are, for the most part, self-explanatory. It must be remembered, also, that the attempt is made here, in a single chapter, to outline, in a sketchy manner, a subject which demands a far greater space than is possible in this book, for its proper elucidation. There is, therefore, no attempt at order, chronologically or otherwise ; the illustrations are merely intended to show the decorative use, in building, to which oak was put in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, in England.

Fig. 17S is the fine Woolhall at Lavenham, in Suffolk, which was somewhat rigorously restored in 1913. The barge-boards are missing, and the projecting bay

Fig. 202

PAVCOCRES, COGGESHALL, ESSEX. CEILING BEAMS.

Ceiling, iS ft. wide by 19 ft. deep. Beam, 14J ins. by 11 ins. Joists, 7 ins. wide by 5 ins. deep.

Fig. 202

PAVCOCRES, COGGESHALL, ESSEX. CEILING BEAMS.

Ceiling, iS ft. wide by 19 ft. deep. Beam, 14J ins. by 11 ins. Joists, 7 ins. wide by 5 ins. deep.

Xoel Buxton, Esq.

windows on the first floor have been cut off. Lavenham has been somewhat unfortunate in the zeal of its restorers. In spite of this, however, Lavenham Woolhall remains as some indication of the half-timber building in East Anglia of the mid-fifteenth century.

The house known as Pavcockes, at Coggeshall in Essex, Fig. 179, is a much better example of judicious restoration. Originally, a fine specimen of a wealthy weaver's house of the late fifteenth century, it had been transformed into cottages, and allowed to become derelict. It was restored, a few years ago, and a considerable amount of richly carved oak was discovered hidden behind plaster. Further illustrations of the elaborate beamed ceilings in this house will be given later on in this chapter.

Fig. 1S0 is from Lavenham, old houses at the corner of Lady and Water Streets,

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