Suffolk Halftimber House In Process Of Demolition

Showing wall-plate with projecting joist-ends under. Note the principals and purlins, and absence of ridge purlin. The roof is of the braced tie-beam kind. The openings on the first floor to receive the windows are shown intact. A strong wind-brace reinforces the gable-ends of the house. Part of the stud-partitioning still remains. The roof has strong collars as well as tie-beams.

Mid-sixteenth century.

h is shown in process of demolition. In the photograph can be seen the projecting joists with wall-plates above, also the braces, principals and purlins. The common rafters have been removed, but the roof framing has been constructed without any ridge purlin. This was a common custom with many of these houses, hence the ridge-sag, which many of these houses exhibit.

  1. 39 and 40 show two oak carved corner posts from an old house in Bury St. Edmunds, now demolished. The original owner has had his arms introduced into
  2. 39 and 40.

OAK CARVED CORNER-POSTS FROM AN OLD HOUSE AT BURY ST. EDMUNDS (NOW DEMOLISHED).

Fig. 39 has the arms of Heigham impaling Cotton, and Fig. 40 impaling Calthorp.

Early sixteenth century. 49

Fig. 40.

the decorative scheme, those of lleigham impelling Cotton in Fig. 39 and Calthorp in Fig. 40. It is possible from these posts to reconstruct the approximate height of the ground floor rooms. Tlie\ measure nearly 5 ft. 3 ins. each, and allowing a brick plinth of 2 ft., with a deduction of a O-in. step from the ground to the floor levels, it will be seen that rooms at this date must have been less than 7 ft. in height from the floor level to the under side of the joists, and this in a house of considerable importance. It will be advisable to bear this measurement in mind when a later chapter on long-case clocks is considered, as when the tall clock went out of fashion, in great mansions,

FRAMEWORK OF WINDOW FROM AN OLD HOUSE AT HADLE1GH, ESSEX.

FRAMEWORK OF WINDOW FROM AN OLD HOUSE AT HADLE1GH, ESSEX.

7 ft. 3 ins. wide by 5 ft. 11 ins. high. Fifteenth century. Victoria and Albert Museum.

during the years from 1735 to 1750, it is to houses of this type, which persisted in numbers during the eighteenth century, especially in country districts, that they were relegated, with the result that bases had to be cut and hood superstructures removed to permit of them standing upright in these low rooms. This, however, is a detail for later consideration.

The same elaboration of traceried carving was often carried into the designing of the windows of these timber houses. Figs. 41 and 42 show the exterior and interior views of an oak window from an old house at Hadleigh in Essex, of the later fifteenth century. The fact is worth}- of notice that there is no sign of a glazing rebate or fillet.

THE INSIDE VIEW OF THE WINDOW FRAMEWORK, FIG. 41, SHOWING SHUTTER REBATE

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