Painted And Gilt Ciiair

In the possession of J. I). Phillips, Esq. 3 ft- i in. high, i ft. il J ins. across seat, i ft. 8 ins. depth of »eat from front to back, i ft. 5 ins. from floor to top of seat. Date about 1800.

period such as this chair, divorced from its propei surroundings. The lofty and grandiose apartments of the earl}7 and middle Georgian periods had given way to an era of quiet, home-like charm. The living rooms, in the usual type of house of the moderately wealthy, were usually low—from ten to twelve feet in height—panelled with a low framed dado with a small surbase or capping moulding, above which was a single panel from dado to cornice, generally from two feet six inches to four feet in width. This wall panelling was nearly always painted in shades of cream or greenish grey, and formed an admirable background for the black-and-gold frames of the engravings and prints of the period. Above this panelling was a small cornice, usually of wood and quite plain in section, with the ceiline

Fig. 359. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

2 ft. 10 ins. from floor to top of back. 2 ft. 10 ins. across front of seat. I ft. 7j ins. depth of seat. I ft. 5j ins. from floor to top of seat. Date about 1795 1800.

Fig. 360. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

2 ft. iol ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. 81 ins. across front of seat. I ft. 5J ins. depth of seat. I ft. 4! ins. from floor to top of seat. Date about 1800.

Fig. 359. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

2 ft. 10 ins. from floor to top of back. 2 ft. 10 ins. across front of seat. I ft. 7j ins. depth of seat. I ft. 5j ins. from floor to top of seat. Date about 1795 1800.

Fig. 360. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

2 ft. iol ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. 81 ins. across front of seat. I ft. 5J ins. depth of seat. I ft. 4! ins. from floor to top of seat. Date about 1800.

either enriched with small iAvags radiating from a central flower, or more frequently quite plain, and painted to match the panelling of the walls. The chinmeypiece was generally of the simple Adam type, in white or inlaid marbles, or of carved wood. On either side the chimney breast was boxed in by a cabinet cupboard, the upper doors glazed in square panes and circular-headed, with a subsidiar\ cornice following the same line and broken in the centre by a .small keystone. The framing of the walls and dado panellings were usually square in section, and where mouldings were used in panels, as in the doors of the cupboards on either side of the fireplace, they were kept studiously small. Windows were deeply recessed, with panelled shutter boxes, reaching to within eighteen inches from the floor, with a low dado carried across on the face line of the flat architraves to form a window boxing or seat. These window seats were usually fitted with lift-up lids, small, loose squab cushions being provided for greater comfort. The judicious admixture of mahogany, satinwood, harewood, japanned and sometimes lacquered furniture, in combination with the soft grey tone of these later eighteenth century apartments, produced an ensemble unrivalled for quiet charm in the whole history of eighteenth centurv furnishing.

Fig- 345 is one of the square-back settees of this period, made to accord with the chairs, the back upholstered and the seat fitted with a long, loose squab cushion. The turned legs on the ends are prolonged above their squares in vase-shaped balusters supporting the simple curved open arms, filled with a diamond lattice-work as in the backs of Figs. 342, 341, and 339. Fig. 346 is another example where the back and arms are filled with caned panels alternating with a similar latticework as in Fig. 345. The framework is of beech, japanned and painted with garlands of flowers, the whole being kept studiously low in tone. The height of the seat is proportioned to allow of a squab cushion as in the previous example. Fig. 347 is a mahogany chair of the same baluster-back French type as the preceding examples, the top rail being panelled and the five balusters placed directly underneath, joined 011 the top with painted arches of Gothic character. This chair differs from the others previously

BEECH SETTEE. (Painted and Gilt.)

6 ft. I in. long acioss front ... seat. 2 ft. 10 ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. ins. depth of »eat. i ft. 5J ins. from floor to top of seat.

Date 1795-1800.

BEECH SETTEE. (Painted and Gilt.)

6 ft. I in. long acioss front ... seat. 2 ft. 10 ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. ins. depth of »eat. i ft. 5J ins. from floor to top of seat.

Date 1795-1800.

illustrated, in the substitution of the shaped and moulded arm support for the usual turned baluster.

  1. 348 shows another type of chair-back of this period with the top rail raised in the centre and the back moulded as one complete panel. The central splat is pierced and latticed, tied together under the top rail with a pendant drapery. The legs are square, tapered, socketed under the seat rail, and finishing in moulded toes. Fig. 349 is a chair-back settee of the same form, in satinwood, decorated with ribbons and flowers, and having the square tapered leg socketed above the castor, which is more characteristic of Hepplewhite than Sheraton. The backs are each filled with five straight balusters, the centre one having a small rectangular panel painted with a spray of flowers. Viewed from the back, settees of this type appear to demand that each upright of the backs should be prolonged below the seat-rail and finish in a leg. Thus Fig. 349, from a front view, appears quite logical, but from the back seems to require eight legs. This is, perhaps, an inevitable consequence of the substitution of the square back for the Hepplewhite shield form. The name of " bar-back sofa " used in the Guide could be much more fittingly applied to this settee than the one so described by Hepplewhite.
  2. 350 is a somewhat unusual piece, apparently a prototype of the mid-Victorian scroll-end couch. The " day-bed" as an article of furniture had lost its vogue by the close of the seventeenth century, when the use of the bed-chamber as a reception-room
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