Mahogany Chair

2 ft. II ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. 7i ins. across front of seat. I ft. 5 ins. depth of seat. I ft. 4 ins. extreme width of back. I ft. 7 ins. extreme height of seat from floor. Date about 1780.

Fig. 211. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

. fi. 2J ins. from floor to back, ft. 9 ins. across front of seat, ft. 5i ins. depth of seat, ft. 7i ins. extreme height of seat from floor, ft. 4 J ins. extreme width of back. Date about 1775-80.

Fig. 211. MAHOGANY CHAIR.

. fi. 2J ins. from floor to back, ft. 9 ins. across front of seat, ft. 5i ins. depth of seat, ft. 7i ins. extreme height of seat from floor, ft. 4 J ins. extreme width of back. Date about 1775-80.

Fig. 212. MAHOGANY ARM CHAIR.

In the possession of Messrs. Waring & Gillon.

3 ft. 4i ins. from floor to top of back. J I ft. 11J ins. across front of seat. I ft. S ins. outside depth of seat. Hate nhnnt 1790.

another departure, where, instead of the back being entirety filled with balusters, these are connected together in the form of a central splat. This we can refer to as a " serpentine-top, shield-back, central-splat cliaii." This model is unusual in the fact that the ornament is carved from boxwood and applied, a method which was practised to a considerable extent by the cabinet-makers who worked for Robert Adam, as we have seen in a previous chapter. In the central splat of this chair may be traced some still lingering influence of the Gothic taste of 1760-70. It would be absurd to suggest a rule, on the meagre evidence available, but it is somewhat remarkable that it is only these central-splatted, shield-backed chairs which have the legs tied together with a stretcher-underframing as a general custom. I am inclined, for reasons which are not easy to define, to place the central-splatted chairs with stretcher-underframings among the very earliest productions of the school of Hepplewhite, and they were probably out of fashion at the date of the death of. the founder of the style. Among these reasons may be mentioned the distinct traces of the Gothic which they nearly all exhibit,—a fashion which had almost died out by the end of the year 17S0 ;—and the fact that French influences were paramount after 1785, which would discourage the use of the stretcher-underframing.

  1. 206 and 207 may be described as " serpentine-top, shield-back, lyre-splatted " chairs. The use of the lyre for the decoration of the backs of chairs was one of the distinctly Hepplewhite motives which were borrowed by Thomas Sheraton, not only without acknowledgment, but with considerable reviling of the creator of the detail. It may be pointed out, as some indication of date, that in the earlier Hepplewhite " elbow " chairs the arms sweep down in one unbroken line from the back to the front
  2. 212. MAHOGANY ARM CHAIR.

In the possession of Messrs. Waring & Gillon.

3 ft. 4i ins. from floor to top of back. J I ft. 11J ins. across front of seat. I ft. S ins. outside depth of seat. Hate nhnnt 1790.

Fig. 213

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