Inlaid Harewood Table

2 ft. 5 ins. high x I ft. 10 ins. wide X I ft. 4 ins. deep. Date ahont 17S0-9Q.

grace to the cabinet. The legs finish in small castors, and are tied together with a cross stretcher rail, tapered on the upper side only, and centred with a turned button. The drawer is banded to form a panel running right across the legs, the opening line of the drawer being concealed. The whole piece is well designed, although the workmanship, especially the cutting of the inlaid " roundels," leaves something to be desired. It must be said, however, that to accurately space these out to fill the required space exactly, especially in the band surrounding the central ovals, demands great nicety and precision of workmanship, as the running guilloche effect of the " roundels " is destroyed if they are not placed exactly together. There is no excuse,

In the possession of Messrs. Gill and Reigate. 3 ft. 9 ins. wide x I ft. 9 ins. deep x 4 ft. 5 ins. total height. Date about 1790.

however, for inlaying many of the holly dots out of the centre. Fig. 157 is a small occasional table in the same fashion, veneered with stained sycamore, the top inlaid with a parqueterie of small cubes and banded with similar inlay of " roundels " to the previous example.

The pull-over tambour writing-table—usually known as a " reed-top "—was a familiar article of furniture at this date. The tambour was formed of moulded beads, glued on the backs to stout canvas, in the same way as modern " roll-top " desks are made. This method had the advantage over the solid cylinder form in requiring little space at the back, the tambour top, when opened, dropping behind the pigeon-holes

Date about 1790.

ill a straight line. Segmental guides, or " runners," were faced inside the quarter-circular sides to keep the tambour rigid when it was pulled over.

Fig. 15S is a mahogany table of this kind, of about 1780-90, the veneer highly bleached —probably bv the action of time and sunlight. The doors are flush veneered, with ovals and mitred surrounds, and banded with holly lines. Behind the tambour are four drawers, three of which have the original handles, eight pigeon-holes, and a small central cupboard, the door of which is now missing. The lower drawer is cock-beaded. Behind the upper doors are sixteen pigeon-holes and four drawers.

Fig. 161. MAHOGANY CHINA CASE.

7 ft. I in. high x 3 ft. 6 ins. wide x I ft. 1 in. deep. n,.te ühnnt 1790

Fig. 159 is another of these tambour writing-tables, of mahogany, with the fronts of the drawers veneered with satinwood. The inside is fitted with eight pigeon-holes, each with an arched " curtain-piece " and six flat drawers below. The writing-bed is lipped and lined with " paste-grain " morocco and fitted with a pull-up slope, strutted underneath. The lower drawer is cock-beaded, the sides being panelled in the same way to correspond.

The solid cylinder-fall bureau or secretaire is of French inception, and is a somewhat rare form in English furniture of this date. Fig. 160 is veneered with mahogany, and inlaid with holly lines and marqueterie of satinwood. The writing-slab is attached at the back to the cylinder, and when pulled forward opens the fall. The top drawer also opens to support the writing-bed. Inside is a sliding trap, made to push back, fitted with a rising desk slope lined with leather, and a well for papers underneath. Behind the cylinder are six drawers, three pigeon-holes, and racks for pens on either side. The general character of the marqueterie is characteristic of the Hepplewhite school, and the same tapered leg with square collar as in Figs. 149 and 150 will be noticed.

Another typical Hepplewhite detail which now claims our attention is the hollowed-out bracket-plinth, or " French foot," as it is generally termed. The next six examples all have this feature. Fig. 161 is a china-case in two sections, each of the same depth— an unusual feature at this period, cabinets being usually made in bookcase form, with the lower carcase projecting from three to six inches beyond the one above. Fig. 162

Fig. 161. MAHOGANY CHINA CASE.

7 ft. I in. high x 3 ft. 6 ins. wide x I ft. 1 in. deep. n,.te ühnnt 1790

Upper part. Lower part.

3 ft. 10J ins. high (without pediment). 3 ft. o ins. high.

11 ins. deep. 1 ft. 4J ins. deep. Pediment gi ins. high. Date about 1790.

MAHOGANY SECRETAIRE ROOKCASE.

Upper part. Lower part.

Depth, 1 ft. ins. Depth, 1 ft. SI ins. Date about 1790.

MAHOGANY SECRETAIRE ROOKCASE.

Upper part. Lower part.

Depth, 1 ft. ins. Depth, 1 ft. SI ins. Date about 1790.

ttllOliANV SECRETARY BOOKCASE.

7 ft. 7 ins. high x 3 ft. 5 ins. wide x 1 ft. 7 J ins. extreme depth. n:1tp iihnnt 1790.

is a case of highly bleached mahogany, the upper doors latticed with flat fillets veneered with rosewood cross-banded and edged with holly lines. The stiles and rails of the lower doors are finished to correspond, and in the panels are ovals of beautifully figured curl mahogany, with feathered surrounds of the same wood. The pediment is inlaid with a curious central device of a Crusader's cross surrounded by a laurelled band, in satinwood, holly, and ebony, and the dentil-member of the cornice is veneered with cross-banded mahogany, with eight small squares of satinwood inlaid at intervals. The frieze is decorated with carved flutes and inlaid shells of holly.

With the introduction of the flat veneered tracery for doors, in place of the usual astragal mouldings, a time-saving, but very reprehensible practice came into vogue of cementing the lattice-work to the glass instead of "ribbing" each panel. In this cabinet each of the upper doors is glazed with one complete panel, the strength of the tracery depending solely on the adhesive which has been used to affix it to the glass. The fitting of the upper carcase indicates that the piece was made specifically to act as a china cabinet, probably to contain the new productions of the Minton potteries at Stoke, which were established at this period.

Fig. 163 is a secretaire bookcase of light mahogany, with the top of the lower carcase veneered with satinwood inlaid with rectangular panels of rosewood on the edges. It is inlaid with purple wood lines in a key pattern, and the lattice-work of the upper doors is flat as in the previous example, formed of one ebon)- and two hollow lines. In this specimen, however, the lattice is " ribbed " behind, with the glass cut into each panel and secured with glaziers' putty. The secretaire is fitted with two long and six smaller drawers, with dividing partitions of purple wood one-eighth of an inch in thickness. Four pigeon-holes and a small central cupboard, the door of which is edged ttllOliANV SECRETARY BOOKCASE.

7 ft. 7 ins. high x 3 ft. 5 ins. wide x 1 ft. 7 J ins. extreme depth. n:1tp iihnnt 1790.

with purple lines to match the drawers, complete the fittings of the interior. The flap is lined with dark green paste-grain morocco leather. The framings of both upper and lower doors are square-shouldered, without veneering, although the cut-out plinth is faced and mitred on the corners in somewhat unusual fashion.

  1. 164 has the fashionable fret-cut pediment of 1780, although the unusual akroter has been omitted. The moulded centres of pediments of this type were intended to support busts, a fashion which had survived from the era of the early " architects' furniture " referred to in the second volume. This bookcase is a good example of the well-designed furniture of this period. The design of the lattice-work in the upper doors is simple and harmonious, this pattern of intersecting ovals being a favourite one with the cabinet-makers of both the Hepplewhite and Sheraton periods. The " French foot " is, in fact, the only detail which indicates the former school.
  2. 165 is a good example of the serpentine-fronted chests of drawers of the period,
Date about 1785.

MAHOcWfc 1500KCASE. (One of a pair.)

In the possession of Messis. Colling iv Young. 6 ft. 4 ins. high (lower carcase, 2 ft. S ins. high). I ft. ins. wide.

Depth : lower part, I ft. 5 ins. : upper part, 1 ft. 0} in. Date about 1780.

MAHOcWfc 1500KCASE. (One of a pair.)

In the possession of Messis. Colling iv Young. 6 ft. 4 ins. high (lower carcase, 2 ft. S ins. high). I ft. ins. wide.

Depth : lower part, I ft. 5 ins. : upper part, 1 ft. 0} in. Date about 1780.

well made in every respect, and with the veneer carefully selected, pieced in the centre of each drawer front, and " feathered " to obtain the utmost richness of effect and to preserve the entire curl figure as in the log. The edges of the drawer rails are crossbanded with the same wood, the plinth being finished in like maimer. The handles are of the earlier fashion, although these flamboyant patterns remained in favour with many cabinet-makers until the close of the eighteenth century. The bow-front was rarely used for chests of drawers, as compared with the serpentine form, the latter being better adapted to show the figure of the wood to advantage, and to provide a more interesting play of light and shade.

Fig. i65 reverts to the classical manner popularised by Robert Adam, although there is little or no suggestion of his influence in this example. This bookcase is one of a pair, and is peculiar in construction in several respects. The framing mouldings of both upper and lower doors are " bolected," i.e. rebated on to, and projecting above the faces of the styles and rails. The cornice is decorated with small flutes in place of the usual dentils, and the frieze of the lower carcase is cnriched with a key-pattern fret lattice. The side pilasters are fluted and reeded, and the cupboard in the lower part is fitted with a central shelf. The back and shelves are of deal — the latter faced with one-inch strips moulded on the edges—mahogany being still a valuable wood at this period.

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