Gilt Table With Mahogany

6 ft. 4 ins. long ■ 2 ft. 6 ins. deep ■ 3 ft. high.

  1. 16 illustrates another fashion—a white-and-gold table wit 111 the top veneered with satinwood, inlaid with marqueterie and decorated with painted garlands of flowers and medallions. The carved fringing under the frieze was a favourite conceit of Robert Adam, and was extensively used for window cornices, the imitation being frequently painted to accord with the material of the curtains and valances.
  2. 17 is a gilt table, one of a pair, where the top is entirely painted and decorated. A protecting glass is a necessity with tables of this kind. Fig. iS is another, and larger, example of these elaborate side tables, which were designed in fairly considerable numbers by the brothers Adam for their wealthy clients.
  3. 19 is a beech table, painted and gilt, the top veneered with satinwood and banded with mahogany, the band being painted with garlands of flowers and edged with a cross-banding of tulip wood. In the original instance this decorated band was
  4. 19 is a beech table, painted and gilt, the top veneered with satinwood and banded with mahogany, the band being painted with garlands of flowers and edged with a cross-banding of tulip wood. In the original instance this decorated band was
4 ft. long ■ 2 ft. deep ■ 3 ft. high.

probably continued along the back of the top. It is not easy to account for the vicissitudes which so much of the eighteenth-century furniture, has undergone, especially such as would necessitate the replacing of a decorated band with a strip of satinwood, as on this table. It is difficult to imagine a table as delicate as this being surmounted by a pier glass, although the moulded base would cover the portion of the top over this satinwood strip. Fig. 19 may be regarded as a good example of cabinet-maker designing, as distinct from the usual quasi-architectural character of nearly all of the work of Robert and James Adam.

Fig. 20 is a table of sycamore, stained a reddish brown, and with an applied composition ornament in the detestable fashion of this period. The top is veneered with figured sycamore, stained with oxide of iron—usually known as "hare-wood" — and inlaid with a marqueterie of holly and ebony. The semi-oval in the centre of the back line of the top is of tlmia, a wood similar in figure but darker in colour than amboyna. Fig. 21 is another of these composition enriched tables ; in this example the framing is gilt, and the top is veneered with plane tree and inlaid with rather coarse marqueterie.

Fig. 20 is a table of sycamore, stained a reddish brown, and with an applied composition ornament in the detestable fashion of this period. The top is veneered with figured sycamore, stained with oxide of iron—usually known as "hare-wood" — and inlaid with a marqueterie of holly and ebony. The semi-oval in the centre of the back line of the top is of tlmia, a wood similar in figure but darker in colour than amboyna. Fig. 21 is another of these composition enriched tables ; in this example the framing is gilt, and the top is veneered with plane tree and inlaid with rather coarse marqueterie.

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