Beech Gilded Chair

In the possession of J. D. Phillips, Esq. 3 ft. 2} ins. from floor to top of back. I ft. 11J ins. across front of seat. 1 ft. 6i ins. depth of seat.

Date about 1790.

unusual feature in these "hoop-back chairs." Fig. 21S has a typical Hepplewhite central splat, " stump-tenoned " into the curved top rail and the back framing of the seat. The legs are square-tapered, finishing in pointed moulded toes. The moulded " pediment " at the base of the splats is missing.

  1. 219 and 220 are described as "cabriole chairs" in the Guide, a term implying " chairs with stuffed backs," and somewhat difficult of comprehension in consequence, having regard to the general use of the term as indicating the Dutch or French curved leg, so frequently used in the first and second volumes of this book. Fig. 219 is the design to which reference is made as "having been executed with good cffcct for his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales." For convenience these chairs may be described as " solid shield-backs." Fig. 220 has the reeded, ribbon-encircled leg before referred to, a conception of purely Hepplewhite origin, in spite of the fact that it has been so generally attributed to Sheraton.
  2. 221, 222, and 223 are further examples of these " solid shield-back " chairs, the first of beech, japanned—although much of the original japan has now perished. The framing of the back and the seat rails are decorated with a small reeded " nulling," the back legs above the seat and the front legs being " pearled." The graceful sweep of the arms and the method of uniting to the squares of the front legs are particularly fine. In the second, both back and seat are carved, an original method, although the present caning is modern. This chair is also of beech, carved and prepared for gilding, traces of the original gold still remaining. The third is also of beech, japanned in white and picked out with gold. The present decoration and upholstery are, of course, modern, but are unquestionably copies of the original condition.

The next characteristic pattern which we have to consider is the elliptical or " ovalback." Two examples from the Guide are

In the possession of C. J. Charles, Esq. 3 ft. o in. high from floor to top of seat. 2 ft. oi in. across front of seat. I ft. Si ins. depth of seat.

Date about 1790.

In the possession of C. J. Charles, Esq. 3 ft. o in. high from floor to top of seat. 2 ft. oi in. across front of seat. I ft. Si ins. depth of seat.

Date about 1790.

given in Figs. 224 and 225. These are the designs R and S referred to in the text as being especially suitable for japanning, "a nciv and elegant fashion which has arisen icithin these few years'' and " which gives a rich and splendid appearance to the minuter parts of the ornaments, which arc generally throivn in by the painter." The suggestion here is that the backs of these chairs should be finished quite flat, the outlines only being pierced, and that the entire decoration should be painted on a japanned ground. The back of Fig. 225 has the central motif of the Prince of Wales' feathers tied with a "true-lovers' knot" below, a detail of which "A. Hepplewhite & Co." appear to have been inordinately proud. Fig. 226 belongs to the school of Adam rather than to that of Hepplewhite, the details being those more usual in the work of the

Figs. 224 and 225. CHAIRS.

I'late S in all editions of the Guide.

Figs. 224 and 225. CHAIRS.

I'late S in all editions of the Guide.

IC)5

lH228.

0 0

Post a comment