Oak Standing Cupboard

5 ft. 2 ins. high by 2 ft. 9 ins. wide by i ins. deep. ¡\lid-sixteenth century.

Victoria and Albert Museum.

by the marqueterie-cutter) from which copies can easily be taken, whereas to reproduce inlay from an actual piece implies both the drawing and pricking of another pattern ; a tedious and laborious task. It is feasible, therefore, to suppose that where two pieces exhibit the same design in inlay (not necessarily the use of the same woods), they are from the same hand or workshop, unless we are to suppose that patterns were made and " prickings " sold, as articles of commerce, to makers throughout England ; a very unlikely proceeding. Of these so-called " Nonsuch " chests,—which are really coffers,— Mr. Percy Macquoid, in his " History of Furniture," illustrates three, in which the same towers are represented. Against this must be set the fact that many chests and cabinets unquestionably from the Rhine Provinces, were imported into England, in which similar devices and methods to those in these " Nonsuch " chests were practised. Figs. 49 and 50 are two views of one of these German cabinets of the seventeenth century. The fronts of the drawers inside can be compared with the panels of Figs. 47 and 48, and w ill show

Fig. 37. OAK DOLE CUPBOARD.

3 ft. 2 A ins. wide by 2 ft. ij ins. high by 1 ft. 6 ins. deep.

Date about 1530. Victoria and Albert Museum.

Fig. 37. OAK DOLE CUPBOARD.

3 ft. 2 A ins. wide by 2 ft. ij ins. high by 1 ft. 6 ins. deep.

Date about 1530. Victoria and Albert Museum.

Fig. 38

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