Also the previous one will showBotw Ssr M

that the former methods of con- ~ "^LJf struction, without the necessity for adhesives, had departed. The mouldings of the back- -two sections of which are missing -have been secured with nails and glue. This is a finely-designed and well-made chair in every7 other respect, as although the top rail has been tenoned on the uprights of the back, instead of between them, the wood is too stout and solid for this method to be a source of much weakness in the chair. There is a good deal of classical influence present, and with its original cresting

Fig. 239

OAK CHAIR.

Dated 1GS2.

Victoria and Albert Museum.

in the form of a cornice of ogee and fillet, probably—this may have been even more marked. Attention may be directed to the top rail with dentil course, and the vertically fluted frieze, with the fillets separated with the parting tool and the punch. These suggest a Middlesex or Hertfordshire origin for the chair. Its date is about the middle of the seventeenth century.

The chair in Chelsworth Church, in Suffolk, here shown in Fig. 236, has its original cushion-moulded top rail to the back, but with a cresting which is certainly of later date. There is the same shape of arm as in many of the preceding examples, cut out, probably,

CHAIR OF ASH, ELM AND FRUIT-WOOD. CHAIR OF APPLE AND YEW.

Mid-seventeenth century. Mid-seventeenth century.

Victoria and Albert Museum. 184

CHAIR OF ASH, ELM AND FRUIT-WOOD. CHAIR OF APPLE AND YEW.

Mid-seventeenth century. Mid-seventeenth century.

Victoria and Albert Museum. 184

so that the sitter could grasp it easily, and, half rising to a standing posture, draw the chair close to a table. The leg and baluster turning is of the same pattern as in Fig. 234.

Fig. 237, of somewhat earlier date and of Lancashire origin, originally came from Hessop Hall, Derbyshire, the former seat of the Earl of Newburgh, whose earldom could hardly have been created at the date when it was made. A comparison of this chair with some of the examples already illustrated will show the similarity in type of this flat-modelled character of carving. The bobbin-turning of the arm supports here indicates the period of the Commonwealth.

Another of the chairs in the Lady Chapel of St. Albans Abbey is shown in Fig. 238. Of similar character to Fig. 235, the back is closely framed, without surrounding mouldings, and with very little recessing of the panel. It has the overhanging top rail with brackets to the back uprights in the manner of its time.

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Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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