Kentish Woodwork Types

Richard Legh

It is merely an example of the school of designing and carving which both helped to found, as exemplified in much of the woodwork in St. Paul's Cathedral and elsewhere. The Renaissance of the South-West, whether in clerical or in secular woodwork, is nearly always richer in detail than in the East of England. It is also, as a rule, exceedingly varied, yet possessing marked characteristics which are typical and recognisable. Such examples as the fine Wrey pew in Tawstock Church, Fig. 68, may be...

Walnut Chairs from to

Charles Style Oak Armchair Cane

HE practice of lathe-turning columns or balusters is of ancient origin,, in England, as we have seen in earlier chapters. It has also been pointed out that turning was little used in Gothic woodwork, in its prime, and that the square, or diamond-sectioned and moulded baluster or mullion was employed, in preference, in chancel and other screens. It is revived, as a novelty, during the reign of Henry III and in the seventeenth century becomes the usual method of fashioning legs of chairs and...

Oak Chest With Iron Strapwork

Oak Chest Iron

6 ft. 4i ins, long by 2 ft. i in, high by I ft. 4 ins. back to front Fourteenth century. Capt. N. R. Colville, M.C. THE CHEST, FIG. 7, WITH LID OPEN, SHOWING THE DECORATIVE PAINTING. THE CHEST, FIG. 7, WITH LID OPEN, SHOWING THE DECORATIVE PAINTING. appearance of being a reconstruction. This type of chest persisted well beyond the fourteenth to the earl fifteenth century, as in Mr. Smedley Aston's example, Figs. 10 and ii, but here the top and the uprights are scratch-moulded, a sure indication...

Walnut Twotier Sideboard

Height, 3 ft. ii ins. width, 4 ft. 2 ins. depth, 1 ft. 6 ins. Late sixteenth century. Church is over-furnished, is original to that edifice. This pulpit is evidently made tip from old panelling. It is much more likely that it was removed from the ruined Aldington Priory, the refectory of which is now a part of the adjoining farm buildings. In the Church are fragments of screens both of late fourteenth and middle fifteenth-century dates, evidently from the same source. The present additional...

Oak Court Cupboard

English Furniture 1680

II. 1 . Kinderman, Ksq. Date about 1680-90. C. H. F. Kinderman, Esq. Date about 1680-90. C. H. F. Kinderman, Esq. Date about 1660-70. Messrs. Gregory and Co. Date about 1660-70. Messrs. Gregory and Co. section, with free versions of the carved triglyph below. The lock is a later addition. Fig. 99 is difficult to date, although it is undoubtedly from the first half of the seventeenth century. It is veneered, with the motto, Sic transit gloria mundi, inlaid in the...

Sixteenthcentury Oak Chest With Panel Of Earlier Date

Manner of the mid-fifteenth-centurv great windows, and there is no trace of the cusping which is so marked on the next example, Fig. 19, a chest from the Lady Chapel of St. Michael's Parish Church at Coventry. This is a typical late fifteenth-century Church muniment or vestment chest of large size and great weight. The ends are closely frame-braced over solid sides, and the front with its uprights is richly ornamented. Here again, it will be noticed that the front panel only is ecclesiastical...

Chest Of Drawers On Stand

Veneered with walnut and inlaid with marqueterie. Date about 1630. Victoria and Albert Museum. after, and when it is remembered that oak furniture, as we have seen, was being extensively produced at this period, it is difficult to understand the fashion for the sombre oak running concurrently with this gaudy inlay, other than on the hypothesis that the latter had to be imported from the other side of the Xorth Sea, and therefore was not available to the same degree. The inlay here, apart from...

Oak Trestle Table Of Light Type

7 ft. long by 2 ft. 3 ins. deep by 2 ft. 6 ins. high. Early sixteenth century. Lord Cowdray. Originally 20 ft. long by 2 ft. 7 ins. deep by 2 ft. 10 ins. high. Top 4 ins. thick. Originally 20 ft. long by 2 ft. 7 ins. deep by 2 ft. 10 ins. high. Top 4 ins. thick. as chests, is possible, as the seats may have been low stools. We know that chairs were not used for this purpose. In the development of table-types, we are compelled to begin with those of trestle form, such as Fig. 125, and to assume...

Oak Muniment Or Vestment Chest

Gothic Ambry Furniture

Michael's Church, Coventry. 6 ft. 5 ins. long by 3 ft. 2 ins. high by 2 ft. 3 ins. back to front. Fifteenth century. iS mannered duplication which is evident in much of the secular woodwork or furniture of this period, both in this country and in France. Fig. 25 is one of the small secular chests of the beginning of the sixteenth century, constructed of oak with a front and top of elm. The two roundels are chip-carved in the late Gothic manner. The cutting is rough, as one...

Arabesque Marqueterie Of Dark Wood On Light Ground

Hour Wall Clock Arabesque

Wetherfield, Esq. veneered with English walnut of good figure. The hood has the Tompion type of cresting refer to Fig. 397 centred with a turned ball. been specially illustrated as an example of akind and quality7 for which the clock-collector should seek. In good condition, with the base intact, and the works nottamperedvith. 100 to i25would be a reasonable price to pay. The collector should, however, seek for exceptional peculiarities, such as dials with the hour circle...

Chapter I

The Development of the Chest and Standing Cupboard. HE chest or coffer was a most important article of furniture, especially during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, both in houses and monastic establishments. Some idea has already been given of the wealth, in carved and decorated woodwork, which must have been general even in small parish churches, until the first quarter of the sixteenth century. Enough has persisted to our day to give some vague idea of the amount and richness which...