Federal Period

Bed Flush Wall Cad Blocks

Table, ca. 1810-1820

  • Massive in scale and proportion
  • High-style Philadelphia Federal bureau, French Empire inspired
  • Mahogany and bird's-eye maple fter the Revolution, American tastes and sympathies transferred from Bntain to France, especially with regard to furniture styles. The French Empire style planned and fostered by Napoleon was adopted and distinctively modified by American cabinetmakers and is typically known as Federal style. In comparison to the light and well-proportioned furniture typified by the Hepplewhite- and Sheraton-style pieces of the end of the Mahogany Period and the early days of the Federal Period, much Federal furniture is da*, heavy, and vulgar. The finest, however, is often superb and owes much to one of the most famous of all American cabinetmakers, Duncan Phyfe, a New York woodworker possessed of great taste and a wonderful eye for proportion.
Federal Style Moldings

Reminiscent of the Sheraton style Pier-type table with ovolo corners

Mahogany and maple painted black with gilt and polychrome Harbor view painted on center of apron

Typical of Baltimore Federal-style painted furniture

  • No stretchers, Sheraton-style tapered and fluted legs
  • Inlay and banding 1 Tapered feet

The 19th Century, 1840-1910

he mid-19th century saw mass-production become the norm in all areas of American life— from farming to high-end furniture making. Some furniture historians refer to this as the era of the "degraded style," and while commercialism certainly resulted in a lot of cheap, shoddy and undistinguished work, there also was a remarkable burgeoning of vigorous new styles, some unabashedly derivative, including Rococo Revival, Egyptian Revival, Gothic Revival, and Italian Revival.

Nineteenth-century furniture (which is often referred to as Victorian-after the reigning British monarch) tends to be thought of as extremely ornamented, overstuffed, and often in terrible taste, but it also includes much innovative elegance, typified by pieces from makers such as Emile Gallé, Louis Majorelle, Michael Thonet, Charles Voysey, and Charles Eastlake. There is, in fact, no one common characteristic of the period other than that of diversity.

Side Chair, ca. 188(1

  • Typical Eastlake style
  • Walnut and leather
  • Relatively simple lines
  • Avoids excesses of French Antique style
  • An attempted return to Gothic design principles
  • Carved design
  • Spindled crest and apron
  • Partially turned front legs Squared-olf stretchers

Library Tabic, ca. 1880

  • Typical of the Modem Gothic style
  • Ebonized cherry
  • Inspired by the craft traditions of the Middle Ages
  • Supposed honesty of construction and matenals
  • No applied ornamentation

Cabinet, ca. 1876

  • Classical motifs
  • Elaborate marquetry panels
  • Typical of Renaissance Revival style
  • Carved, curved, and applied gilt ornamentation
  • Maximum opulence ■ Rosewood

Shaker, 1800-1900

Throughout the 19th century, the Shaker communities were producing furniture so different from everything else being made that the furniture is now recognized as a major Amencan style. Its essential quality is simplicity. Eschewing ornamentation, the Shakers made furniture that not only was eminently practical and honest but also possessed a restrained elegance. Often giving the appearance of great delicacy, Shaker pieces are nonetheless constructed on sound and sturdy principles and have been the original inspiration for many a woodworker attracted by their straight lines and lack of ornamentation.

C.uphoard-Chest, ca. 18.W

Pine; originally painted red • Pinned mortise and tenons

  • Turned pulls and pegs
  • Molded-lip drawer fronts
  • Fully dovetailed drawers
  • Simplicity of form offset by sophisticated joinery
  • Raised panels

Side Chair, ca. 1840

  • Woven tape seat
  • Seemingly simple, but thoughtfully designed and carefully constructed
  • Slats graduated to become wider from bottom to lop
  • Tops of slats are beveled
  • Back legs outfitted with "tillers" lor greater comfort (tillers allow you to lean back in the chair without damaging it)

C.uphoard-Chest, ca. 18.W

Pine; originally painted red • Pinned mortise and tenons

  • Turned pulls and pegs
  • Molded-lip drawer fronts
  • Fully dovetailed drawers

Side Table, ca. 18.10

  • The quintessential Shaker table
  • Cherry, with pine interiors
  • Tapered legs, turned at feet
  • Large top with wide overhang
  • No molding, carving, or inlay
  • Fully dovetailed, flush front drawer

Arts and Crafts. 1890-1920

  • Fumed white oak typical of Stickley furniture
  • Rectilinear, with reverse flying buttress corbels
  • Exposed mortise-and tenon joinery
  • Structural integrity embodied by post-and lintel design system
  • Handwrought hardware

Roycroft logo, stamped on most pieces

Signature Roycroft bulbous foot on tapered leg

Dining Choir, ca. 1910

  • White oak, leather seat
  • Plain, Mission-style pinery with distinctive Roycroft tapered legs
  • Bulbous feet
  • Well finished surfaces, with design emphasizing workmanship
  • Through tenons
  • Oversized battens
  • Locking escutcheons
  • Butterfly keys
  • Proud partition edges

Signature Roycroft bulbous foot on tapered leg

  • Design by Greene and Greene
  • Structural elements emphasized as design features
  • White oak
  • Protruding dowel ends
  • Fumed white oak typical of Stickley furniture
  • Rectilinear, with reverse flying buttress corbels
  • Exposed mortise-and tenon joinery
  • Structural integrity embodied by post-and lintel design system
  • Handwrought hardware

Roycroft logo, stamped on most pieces

Reacting against the fashionable excesses and often shoddy work of mass production, the English designer William Morris inspired a generation of Ameri can furniture designers dedicated to honesty, utility and, above all, good-quality workmanship. Charles and Henry Greene, Gustav Stickley, Ralph Whitehead (who founded the Byrdcliffe Arts Colony) and the anonymous craftsmen of the Roycroft Community in East Aurora, N.Y., produced a body of furniture variously known as Mission, Arts and Crafts, and Craftsman furniture, which has remained popular-and distinct in style-to the present, taking its place as a legitimate major Amencan style.

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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Responses

  • laura
    How reverse flying buttresses work?
    7 years ago

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