Dimensions Of Tables

Variety.

Length.

Width-

Height.

Remarks.

Bedroom

31

•T>

2i)

H

18

18

30

Cammcde.

Bfjou

30

m

Carvio* table

12

•20

36

table

36

20

:M)

Kxt*n*icii tiiblo . ..

66

66

;;o

Hound.

44

-54

54

30

Square.

41

3*

Oval.

t. ••

42

•27

29

ii ••

iU

£4

29

U .1

60

86

20

Tra. Luble

IS

IS

20

Round.

ft ii

18

24

> 30

17

2λ

Upper sho:lf.

ii <i

•23

18

Lower Shelf.

Note: All dlmensiOE3 are In Inches.

Note: All dlmensiOE3 are In Inches.

The parts of a tabic have already been named; it remains to see how they arc put together.

The frame is joined to rhe legs either by the mortise and tenon or by doweling. The former joint was the old way of framing, but since the introduction of dotoels the tenon has largely gone out of use among furniture makers. They consider it old-fashioned. And owing to the shrinkage of the tenon or the carelessness with which it is made it does not seem as strong or equal to a dowel-joint.

The mortise and tenon consists of a tongue (tenon) cut on the end of one of the joined pieces so as to fit tightly in a cavity (mortise) sunk in the other piece. In table work the tenon is on the end of the frame and may or may not be its full width, while the mortise is in the leg. Plate I.

The dowel joint derives its name from the dowel, a wooden pin, uied ior fastening the two pieces together by inserting part of its length in one piece, the rest of it entering a corresponding hole in the other. Where possible more than one dowel is used. In table work two or more are fitted in holes bored for them in the end of the frame, and in the proj>er position on the legs are corresponding holes in which the dowels fit, and* are glued when the two parts are brought together. Some small tables are constructed without a frame: in place of it there is a wooden cleat fastened to the underside of the top and the full diameter of the leg is inserted in this block; or if the leg is of large size it is tenoned into the block.

The top of a table may be solid or veneered. When small and cheap work is desired it can be made of solid wood; but otherwise it should be built up and veneered. Solid wood tops shrink, crack, or warp. The only sure way of avoiding these unfortunate occur-ances is to "build-up" the top. The building up process consists in constructing a core of some common, well-dried, lifeless wood, preferably chestnut or pine. This core is of several strips of wood doweled together at the edges until a board is made about the size of the required top. These strips are arranged in a way that the annular rings curve in opposite directions in each alternate piece. The core is next cross veneered on both sides with hardwood, generally oak. A cross veneering is laid so that the grain is at right angles to that of the wood on which it is applied. Iti table work it is at right angles to the grain of the core and the finish veneer; both of these naturally follow the length of the top. All round the edge of the top, after it is cross veneered, is fastened a strip of the finish wood of the table. (Plate I.) Finally, both sides are again veneered with the finish wood; that is, if the wood is not too expensive. If it is costly a cheaper veneer is placed on the underside.

When the design calls for the edge of the top to appear thick it is a needless waste of material to construct it of wood the full thickness, besides making an unnecessarily heavy piece of furniture. To avoid this, and yet obtain the appearance wanted, a frame of wood is fastened to the underside of the otherwise thin top, giving the thickness required. This frame is called the lining piece and the top is said to be lined up.

The method of fastening the top to the frame of the table varies with the class of work, and the size. If it is a small table no special care is taken, the fastening consisting of screws driven through the

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