Third Type Of Cane Chairs

The third type of cane chairs are those in which the stiles of the back are not turned, but moulded, and appear to carry in a continuous line over the top. In this type the stiles of the back are often the frame for the cane.

A very fine example of this type is shown Wfl ab^F^^fr^?*^. in Figure 475. It will be seen that the entire Bfl^Kf^S^plkS space between the stiles of the back is filled with cane without any suggestion of a splat. g n ir, 4--

The cresting is cut in a design which is a mix- Cane «^Spanish feet, ture of Moorish and European styles known as 1680-1700.

the Mudejar style. The legs and supports of the arms originally had reeded, bulbous turnings, but a number of applied parts have been lost. The legs terminate in Spanish feet. The curving of the front stretchers follows the outline of the cresting. The chair is made of walnut and is probably of European origin. It belonged at one time to the Wyllys family, of Hartford, and is now in the collection of the Connecticut Historical Society.

Figure 476 shows an example of a Spanish chair of this period. The seat and back are covered with Spanish carved leather embellished with large brass nails. The legs are turned and terminate in Spanish feet, and the front stretcher is carved in a design of entwining scrolls. This chair is at the Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia.

Figure Carving Leather Images

Spanish Leather Chair, latter half of seventeenth century.

Figure 477 is a simple example of the style without carving, the stiles of the back being moulded instead of turned and the moulding extending over the top. Although the piece has a separate splat, it is classified as belonging to this third type, because the stiles are moulded instead of turned, as in Figure 475. The legs are turned and terminate in Spanish feet.

Figure 477 is a simple example of the style without carving, the stiles of the back being moulded instead of turned and the moulding extending over the top. Although the piece has a separate splat, it is classified as belonging to this third type, because the stiles are moulded instead of turned, as in Figure 475. The legs are turned and terminate in Spanish feet.

Jacobean Cane Chair
Cane Chair, Spanish feet, about 1700. Cane Chair, scroll legs, about 1700.

Figure 478 shows another interesting variation of the style. The cresting is formed of a series of steps without any curves. The supports to the arms arc S scrolls and the legs are quite suggestive of the unilateral S-scroll feet shown in Figure 456, and are clearly the forerunners of the cabriole leg then about to come into fashion. The skirt is cut in two arched curves. The last two mentioned chairs belong to the writer.

Figure 479 shows a later variation of this style in the writer's possession. The sweep of the back is in a deep, continuous curve instead of being broken at the seat. A bird's head is carved at each end of the cresting and at the centre arc two birds' heads with beaks together, ' he legs are cup-shaped and terminate in Spanish feet. The X underbraciug i» particularly graceful. J he legs, bracing, and cutting of the sk;*"t strongly suggest that on the chamber-table or low-boy illustrated ;n Figure 72, to which period this chair belonged.

Cane Chair, Spanish feet, 1690-1700.

Figura 4S0.

Upholstered Chair, turned legs, about 1700.

Figure 4K0 is an example of an upholstered chair belonging to this period. The frames of the back and seat are entirely covered, but the outl ne clearly indicates the period. The skirt is cut in the cyrna curve designs which were so popular in the Dutch period. The legs and bracings are turned. 1 'lis chair is the property of the writer.

Figure 481 shows a side chair the outline of which is almost the same as that shown in Figure 477 The back and seat, however, are upholstered nstead of caned. This chair is in the Bolles Collection and belongs to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Figure 482 shows a side chair very similar to that shown in the preceding figure, except that it has a cane back and, originally, a cane seat, the legs terminating in simple Spanish feet. The chair is owned by the Connecticut Historical Society.

Figure 483 is an unusual chair belonging to the Connecticut Historical Society. It will be seen that it is a banister-back chair but belongs to the third type of cane

Figure 483 is an unusual chair belonging to the Connecticut Historical Society. It will be seen that it is a banister-back chair but belongs to the third type of cane

Leather Chair, Spanish feet, 1700-10. Cane Chair, Spanish feet, 1700-10.

chairs because the stiles are moulded. Very few banister-backs are found in this design, most of them belonging to the first type, as shown in Figure 461. The legs are turned and terminate in Spanish feet.

Figures 484 and 485 show two variations of the same style with upholstery instead of cane. They are practically alike, except that one has Spanish feet and the other turned feet. Figure 484 belongs to Mr. William Meggat and Figure 485 to the writer.

We now come to another variation of this style which shows markedly the influence of the Dutch style then coming into vogue.

Figures 486 and 487 have backs of cane similar to Figure 482, but the legs are cabriole in form terminating in the Dutch or club foot. The former has the earh'er form of leg showing a suggestion of turning above the cabriole leg. It belonged to the late Mrs. Frank H. Bosworth and Figure 487 belongs to the writer.

figure 488 shows a still latei variation of this chair, and is especially interesting in that it so successfully combines the cane with the succeeding Dutch

Banister-Back Chair, 1710- 20.

style, t he back has the Dutch wooden splat. The legs are cabriole terminating in Dutch feet. The eailier style, however, is indicated by the cane which tills in the space between the splats and the stiles, and the seat is also cane. The carved cresting is also suggestive of the earlier style and is composed of scrolls and a shell ornament. This chaii must be about contemporaneous with the introduction of the Dutch style so beautifully are the two mingled. It is in the Bulkeley Collection.

Figure 484.

Leather Chair with Spanish feet, 1700 10.

Figure 484.

Leather Chair with Spanish feet, 1700 10.

Dutch Colonial Furniture

Figure 490 shows an arm and a side chair in which the backs are in the pure Dutch style (Figure 494), but the legs are in the earlier turned form ter-

Jacobean Chair Cabriole

Cane Chair, cabriole legs, 1710-20.

Chair showing Dutch influence, 1710-15.

Figure 489 shows another transition piece. The outline of the back is similar to that shown in Figure 477, but it has the Dutch splat instead of cane. The legs are turned and terminate in Spanish feet. This chair is the property of Miss Augusta Manning, of Hartford.

Figure 490 shows an arm and a side chair in which the backs are in the pure Dutch style (Figure 494), but the legs are in the earlier turned form ter-

Cane Chair, cabriole legs, 1710-20.

Chair showing Dutch influence, 1710-15.

minating in Spanish feet. This type of chair was very common throughout New England, and, judging from the number found, must have been made in sets. These pieces are in the Bolles Collection.

Figure 491 shows another chair of this type from the Blaney Collection. The back is not so well worked out, but the interesting feature to note is that the turned legs terminate in short, bandy legs with Dutch feet instead of Spanish feet.

Another interesting variation is shown in Figure 492 which is in the Bolles Collection in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The only suggestion of an earlier style is the carved cresting, otherwise the chair very closely resembles the chairs in the Dutch style. It will be noted that there are two Flemish scrolls with a C scroll between, a very unusual decoration in so late a piece. The legs are turned for a short distance below the seat and then are cabriole with Dutch feet and underbrace.

It will be seen from the foregoing illustrations that this third type of cane chair was finally carried into the Dutch style.

Figure 490.

Chairs showing Dutch influrncc. 1710-20.

Figure 490.

Chairs showing Dutch influrncc. 1710-20.

Figure 493 shows a chair very similar to that in the preceding figure but of a later date. The back is in the Dutch style, and the only suggestion of the carved cresting shown on the preceding piece is the slight carving at the centre of the top. In other respects the chairs are almost identical, having the same mouldings at the base of the splat and the same turning on the legs and stretchers. This chair is in the possession of the writer.

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